Afro-marxist modernity. Ghana and Angola in comparison

“All that is solid melts into air, all that is holy is profaned, and man is at last compelled to face with sober senses his real conditions of life, and his relations with his kind.”[1]

“It was commonly thought that the time had come for the world, and particularly for the Third World, to choose between the capitalist system and the socialist system. The underdeveloped countries […] must, however, refuse to get involved in such rivalry. [They] must endeavour to focus on their very own values as well as methods and style specific to them. […] The choice of a socialist regime, of a regime entirely devoted to the people […] will allow us to progress faster in greater harmony.”[2]

Marx’ depiction of change in a modern, capitalist society – evoked, he argues, by the constant revolutionising of the instruments of production – is part of a theory, which, in its various manifestations in the 20th century, provided the basis for a modernity radical opposed to the prescribed one. The Cold War between the two opposing political and economic systems, of which Fanon speaks, can indeed be regarded as a competition between these two versions of modernity propagated by Washington and Moscow, respectively. Fanon’s directive for Africa, reflecting the truly global dimension of this contestation, may seem contradictory at first sight, but, as will be shown, is referring to a distinct version of the modernity propagated by the latter, an Afro-Marxist modernity, which will be the topic of this essay. Using Africa as one common geographical frame bears risks, given the massive differences in social and political developments throughout the 19th and 20th century. Still, the combining colonial experience and the later discussed Pan-African movement, closely intertwined with Marxism, justify the common analysis. After defining modernity as well as its Marxist and, finally, Afro-Marxist notions, the proliferation of these ideas is outlined, both in the form of the Soviet Union’s as well as Cuba’s ties to the various African movements and independent states and the education of Africans outside Africa. Finally, the realization of these ideas and the differing manifestations are described, using Ghana and Angola as two case studies contrasting a non-violent nation-building project, and a radical, militant struggle. Sources by Kwame Nkrumah, leader of the Ghanaian independence movement and the MPLA, one of the parties in the Angolan war against the Portuguese and the subsequent civil war help to show that the manifestation of spread ideas depended heavily on single African actors as well as the Cold War geopolitical situation. In order not to overcomplicate the terminology and to find a depth of the ideological differentiation appropriate to the length of the essay, Marxism is used in a broad sense as relating to the basic Marxist claim for the control of the means of production by the working class (even in their absence as in many developing countries at the time) or, in broader terms, a mass-based politics with an anti-capitalist stance.

To begin with, modernity, in general terms, is understood as an overall approach to or concept of life in the modern age, in ideological terms defined as post-enlightenment era and, to differentiate it from post-modernity, based on the first and second industrial revolutions. “As the basic characteristic and embodiment of the developmental process of modern society, modernity manifests itself in all aspects of social life.”[3] Following Marshall Berman, we find the crucial phase of modernisation, i.e. the striving for a – more or less radical – changing of society, based on new ideas, in the time after the “great revolutionary wave of 1790s”, in which an abruptly emerged modern public “shares the feeling of living in a revolutionary age”, but at the same time remembers the material and spiritual conditions of the pre-revolutionary era.[4] Modernity also “entailed some very distinct shifts in the conception of human agency, and of its place in the flow of time. It carried a conception of the future characterized by a number of possibilities realizable through autonomous human agency”[5]. This striving for another organization of society, however, we have to understand as split into a global multitude with overlapping similarities, but also clear local distinctions.

Marxism constituted the most radical form of this new understanding of human agency. By developing an alternative, but all the more enthusiastic, model of a just, industrialized society, enjoying the benefits of modern technology and industrial goods, Marx delivered a blueprint for the reorganization of societies which enjoyed unforeseeable popularity in the 20th century. Even more important for our case was, however, the realization of this rather vaguely defined concept of modernity by the Bolsheviks and the perception of this experiment in the rest of the world. Soviet modernity was a way of the engagement of the masses – including women – in the ideological vision of the party. In its refutation of Marx’ idea, that the socialist revolution could only be successful in developed, capitalist societies, the Soviet Union constituted a form of modernization based on mechanisation, industrialisation and overall-control of the economy and society by a vanguard party which came to power only by means of militancy and violence.[6] In the Cold War context after 1945, finally, “modernity came in two stages: a capitalist form and a communal form, reflecting two revolutions – that of capital and productivity, and that of democratization and the social advancement of the underprivileged.” In this above described rivalry for notions of modernity, both sides had to prove “the universal applicability of their ideologies” by exporting them to the not yet developed world. [7] Marxism thus became a concept of development and, paradoxically – given Marx’ idea that nations would vanish after the realization of communism – nation-building and therefore became a popular approach to modernity. For this essay, we distinguish between three forms of dissemination of this Marxist modernity: material support, ideological connections and the loose spread of ideas.

Afro-Marxist modernity, finally, can be seen as an adaptation of these ideas to the African context. Pan-Africanism, i.e. the idea that the liberation of one country is only the first step towards the liberation and unification of the whole of Africa, played a crucial role in many anti-colonial movements, most prominently in Nkrumah’s concept of African socialism. Despite being Marxist in word and deed, Afro-Marxist movements stressed that they were “departing in significant ways” from classical Marxism.[8] This also meant that Afro-Marxism did not necessarily entail any form of political alignment with Moscow in the Cold War. In fact, the non-aligned-movement was very popular among anti-capitalist African governments.[9] “The eclectic nature of Afro-Marxism allowed adoptive regimes a certain autonomy with regard to Moscow while still being allowed to present themselves as ‘progressive’.”[10]

Despite this non-necessity of direct links to Moscow, the Soviets played a crucial role for many Afro-Marxist movements. While the Bolsheviks took an anti-imperialist stance from the beginning on, which they tried to spread through the Comintern, the actual support as well as the strength of Marxist movements in Africa was relatively poor initially. In the 1930s, the support increased even further due to the common fascist threat with the imperial powers.[11] In the decade after 1945, then, sub-Saharan Africa was considered “relatively unimportant in terms of geopolitics.”[12] After Khrushchev dropped Stalin’s two-camp theory, a more pragmatic approach defined Moscow’s relationship with Africa. Even countries without a distinct anti-capitalist stance received material supply, which was regarded as an anti-Western investment.[13] In general terms, one can distinguish between two phases of Soviet influence in Africa: after supporting newly-independent countries, especially Guinea, Mali and Ghana from 1958 onwards, the USSR, as well as Cuba, intervened in several armed conflicts or civil wars in the 1970s, most importantly in Angola, Mozambique, and Ethiopia.[14]

While the USSR was also the host for students from – not only anti-capitalist – African countries, most prominently at the People’s Friendship University in Moscow[15], and thereby tried to actively propagate Soviet modernity among Africans, the education of Africans in the West was even more important in many cases. Often already “dedicated to such staples of modernity as technology and systematization”[16] through colonial education, links to communist parties especially in Britain, France and Portugal helped African elites to develop their Afro-Marxist ideas of how to gain political as well as economic independence from the West and to build a just and progressive society thereafter. The Western education also helps to explain the focus on science and education, “which were at the heart of the project to build modern states in the Third World.”[17] The links to European and Soviet communists, however, must not be overestimated. Afro-Marxist leaders “were out to win power for themselves rather than to place their movements and countries under external communist domination.”[18]

The actual Afro-Marxist nation- and state-building can be distinguished, like the Soviet support, in two phases: “During the late 1950s and early 1960s countries such as Ghana, Guinea, Mali, Tanzania and Zambia, claimed to have adapted socialism to their own national circumstances, producing territorial variants of what was vaguely described as ‘African Socialism’, or ‘Populist Socialism’”, which favoured “broad-based hegemonistic mass movements of the anti-colonial struggle” over Leninist vanguard parties. Since the realization of their socialist programs failed, these first Afro-Marxist regimes faced deep troubles in the late 1960s and many fell victim to military coups. The result was, however, no retreat from the Marxist path of modernization. Rather, a more radical Marxist approach was presented as an answer to the failure of these regimes. The first African “People’s Republic” in Congo (Brazaville), established in 1969 after a putsch by radical soldiers, is the first example of this more radical Marxist state model. Yet, a Marxist-Leninist party was only established years after the acquisition of power. The same is true for Somalia, Benin and Ethiopia. This more radical Marxist approach was even “used by political dissidents to challenge the legitimacy of established Marxist rulers.”[19] The most radical and militant manifestation of Afro-Marxism, however, could be seen in the former Portuguese colonies and the civil wars resulting from the late decolonization process.

The history of Ghanaian, and indeed African independence cannot be written without the person of Kwame Nkrumah. The leader of the independent movement and first president of the newly independent country “became a symbol of hope for other colonised people around the world”[20], especially in Africa, and most important advocate of Pan-Africanism. Through his western education, both in the US and the UK, he came into contact with Marxist ideas as well as communist and African organisations. He also played a key role in the 1945 Manchester fifth Pan-African Congress, where he discussed his ideas with other key African politicians like Frantz Fanon.[21] In 1947 he was invited to become head of the United Gold Coast Convention (UGCC).[22] He “arrived in a country facing serious postwar difficulties. Unemployment was rampant, prices had soared and the all-important cocoa crop was threatened by disease”[23], which in 1948 led to riots and demonstrations. Nkrumah, more radical than the other UGCC members, founded the Convention People’s Party (PCC) in 1949, which “demanded ‘Self-Government Now’ and began to mobilise trade unionists, farmers, youth and ex-servicemen’s associations”[24] and thereby channelled the anti-colonial mood in the country. In 1951, while in prison for organising demonstrations, he won the general election with over 90 percent. During this campaign his party propagated a resolute modern programme, including “free education and medical care, the introduction of heavy industry, railroad electrification [and] the mechanization of agriculture”[25] and were thus already promoting a modernity with a Marxist stance. Following his appointment as prime minister of the Gold Coast in 1952, he and the CPP led the country peacefully to “internal self-government” and, finally, to independence in 1957, when Nkrumah became first president of renamed Ghana.[26] Having already determined the discourse about the future of the country in the late colonial era, the term “development” became ubiquitous after 1957. “Development, the objective good, was the one tenant upon which the Cold War powers in the United Nations, as well as the Third World powers at Bandung, could all agree.” The introduction of annual development plans, focusing on industrialisation and infrastructure projects led the county on a modernization path established first in the Soviet Union. Development also included a focus on, especially technical, education and technology.[27]

These symbols of modernity in the first independent sub-Saharan African country were not established in an explicit Marxist framework at the beginning. Indeed, Nkrumah’s foreign policy swayed between East and West several times while officially being part of the Non-Aligned Movement, which illuminated the “cultivation of an enlightened, humanist, and morally and socially reforming modernity”.[28] Soviet material assistance for Ghana started in 1960, when an agreement was signed providing for cultural and technological cooperation as well as the exchange of teachers and students. In another agreement following soon after, the exchange of Soviet industrial products for Ghanaian raw materials was arranged.[29] This cooperation, however, was only one part of Ghana’s foreign aid, albeit presenting the educational, technological and industrial modernity more symbolically than the US loans. It was not until 1964, that Ghana in word and deed ultimately moved closer to a Soviet-Marxist modernity, although Nkrumah never fully accepted it while being president.[30]

At this point it is worth looking closer at one of Nkrumah’s most important publications, “Africa Must Unite”[31] from 1963. In a chapter titled “Building Socialism in Africa”, he describes his vision of an African socialism. Although he names different parts of Marxist modernity like “industrialisation”, “public ownership of the means of production”, a government-controlled economy as well as the role of the PCC, which is “entirely Ghanaian in content and African in outlook, though imbued with Marxist socialist philosophy”, he denies the Soviet Union as the role model of this modernization and states, that “there is no universal pattern for industrialization that can serve as an absolute model for new nations emerging out of colonialism.” Two things become clear in Nkrumah’s view: Afro-Marxist modernity is perceived as a distinct African adaptation of the spread ideas of Marxist theory, and the Soviet role model is denied, despite the mentioned material support for the realization of this modernity. Nkrumah’s more radical Marxist or rather anti-Western course caused his downfall in 1966, when a military coup overthrew his government while he was on a piece mission in Vietnam.[32] While in exile, he continued publishing and reverted to a more radical Marxist, which made his ideology, “Nkrumahism”, a source of inspiration even for Marxist Afro-Americans, as evident in a pamphlet published by the “All-African People’s Revolutionary Party” in Washington in 1982, where his Pan-Africanism is extended to the idea of an African nationhood and one – centuries old – common, as well as global and anti-capitalist struggle all Africans around the world are part of. “Scientific socialism” is presented as an answer and “historical necessity”, realized by a vanguard party formed out of the – male and female – intelligentsia of Africans in Africa and in the diaspora.[33] His ideology thus became a means of dissemination of a specific notion of modernity itself.

Angola presented a quite different case, both in the type of the colonial rule and, resulting from it, the way the decolonization process took place. For the Portuguese governments, especially after the erection of Salazar’s Estado Novo in 1926, Angola and its other colonial possessions constituted overseas departments of the Portuguese nation and played a crucial part in the Portuguese economy. In the 1960s, large-scale development plans and an increase in the settler population emphasized Angola’s importance for the regime. At the same time, violence – remaining the only viable expression of anti-colonial opposition due to the government’s stance on the colonial question – broke out between the government and different nationalist movements which, one the one hand, consisted of the so-called mestiços (mixed) and assimilados (Westernized), which were parts of the urban population and felt increasingly threatened in their position by the growing number of settlers and, on the other hand, of mostly rural Africans hardly affected by the colonial modernity. This split in terms of class (and, to an extent, race) in the anti-colonial movement also features the two main factions in the civil war, the MPLA and the FNLA. The former emerged from contacts between Angolan students in Portugal and the Portuguese Communist Party – which acted as an intermediary of Soviet modernity due to their close links to Moscow[34] – and became more and more radical Marxist. While these movements also represented different ethnic groups, these splits were not the reason for the civil war. Quite on the contrary, the territorial integrity of the Angolan “nation”, defined by the Portuguese imperialists, remained unquestioned by the anti-colonial movements.[35]

Already during the anti-colonial, but most importantly during the following civil war resulting from the “Carnation Revolution” in 1974, Angola became a Cold War proxy war with a multitude of players involved. While the US, South Africa, China and Zaire supported MPLA’s opponents, UNITA and the FNLA, the Angolan Afro-Marxists received large-scale military aid from the Soviet Union (as well as its European allies), various African countries, including Ghana and Congo Brazaville (where the MPLA had its base prior to the declaration of independence in 1975) as well as the supply of 12,000 Cuban troops in late 1975, which proved crucial for the survival of the MPLA during Pretoria’s invasion.[36] These ideological connections to the communist world, however, were the result of a quest for international supply initially in the West, which was denied due to their Marxist reputation despite the initial refusal of the leadership of a clear Marxist stance. In 1964, finally, the MPLA positioned itself in the Socialist Camp and established the connections which guaranteed its victory in the civil war.[37] Apart from the overt Marxist program, the anti-imperialist struggle of other movements, especially in Vietnam and Algeria, became crucial for the MPLA’s understanding of being part of a global struggle.[38]

Modernity in the Angolan case was closely connected to the term “national liberation”. In a speech over Radio Tanzania from 1968, the leader of the MPLA, Agostinho Neto, outlined his stance on the war against the Portuguese, which he regarded as part of a global, anti-capitalist struggle. It becomes clear, that militancy is part of modernity, the armed action is a “school” for the warriors which shall lead the nation in the struggle for full independence, i.e. from the Portuguese and the foreigners owning the natural resources. Unlike Nkrumah, Neto did not propagate Pan-Africanism, but stressed the “anti-racial” stance of his movement, a reference to the racial background of the MPLA. He also addresses modernity in a direct manner when speaking of the MPLA’s strive for the “liquidation of ignorance, disease and primitive forms of social organization” and the need for industrialisation, all implemented by a strong “vanguard party” which “must control the life of the country during every moment.”[39] Although Neto didn’t address the links to the Soviet Union in this speech, the MPLA was transformed into a Marxist-Leninist ‘vanguard worker’s party’ after the proclamation of the People’s Republic of Angola in 1975 and a visit of Neto in Moscow in 1976.[40] In the new program, “there was no mention of ‘African socialism’, a formula which Moscow distrusted as unscientific.”[41] Despite these close ties, the Angolan economy remained oriented towards the West.[42]

A triptych from about 1975, depicting the three leaders of the Marxist struggle in Angola (Castro, Neto, Brezhnev), exhibited in London in 2016 (red4.jpg), marks not only the cultural implementation of Afro-Marxist modernity in Angola, realized through global Marxists cooperation, it also shows the post-modern reception of the topic in the post-colonial metropolis.[43] As we have seen, Afro-Marxist modernity manifested itself in different ways throughout time. In Ghana, ideological links as well as the material support in form of Ghanaian-Soviet cooperation, were only established during the end of Nkrumah’s reign. However, the spread of Marxist ideas was influential for his entire thinking, beginning with his Western education, and, consequently, the implementation of a form of Afro-Marxism in Ghana, closely linked to the idea of Pan-Africanism, and shaped the discourse around the term “development”. Angola presents a different picture: the proliferation of modernity happened most importantly in the form of military assistance as a means of material support. Moreover, ideological connections with communists in Portugal, Cuba and the Soviet Union defined the movement from the beginning on. The inevitability of radical militancy made the MPLA leaders use these ties to manifest an Afro-Marxist modernity which in ideological and military terms relied much more on non-African Marxist powers than in Ghana. The dissolution of the Warsaw Pact, however, as well as the on-going UNITA insurgency and the failure of the implemented economic system made the MPLA finally open the country towards a market-oriented model and a multi-party system.[44] Has Afro-Marxist modernity thus “melted into air” and been replaced by a neoliberal, universal postmodernity, in which it is reduced to the topic of a post-modern exhibition?

Primary Sources

“All-African People’s Revolutionary Party. Some aspects of its origins, objectives, ideology & program.” Political pamphlet, published by the All African People’s Revolutionary Party, Washington D.C. in 1982 or 1983. Source: African Activist Archive. URL: http://africanactivist.msu.edu/document_metadata.php?objectid=32-130-1C55.

Fanon, Frantz: The Wretched of the Earth (New York: Grove Press, 2004).

Marx, Karl: The Communist Manifesto, edited by Frederic L. Bender (New York: Norton & Company, 1988).

Neto, Agostinho: “A message to companions in the struggle.” Speech, delivered on 06.06.1968 over Radio Tanzania in the program “The Voice of Angola in Combat”. Source: African Activist Archive. URL: http://africanactivist.msu.edu/document_metadata.php?objectid=32-130-1188.

Nkrumah, Kwame: Africa Must Unite (London: Heinemann Educational Books, 1963).

Ractliffe, Jo: “Mural portraits depicting Fidel Castro, Agostinho Neto and Leonid Brezhnev, painted on the wall of a house in Viriambundo, Angola, circa 1975.” Triptych, part of: Courtesy of Stevenson, Cape Town/Johannesburg. URL: http://calvert22.org/images/uploads/pages/Red_Africa/slideshow1/_element_slideshow/red4.jpg. Published in the exhibition “Red Africa” of the Calvert 22 Foundation, London, 4 Feb – 3 Apr 2016. URL: http://calvert22.org/red-africa/.

Secondary Sources

Adi, Hakim; Sherwood, Marika: Pan-African History. Political figures from Africa and the diaspora since 1787 (London: Routledge, 2003).

Berman, Marshall: All That Is Solid Melts Into Air. The Experience of Modernity (New York: Penguin Books, 1988).

Eisenstadt, S.N.: Multiple Modernities, Daedalus, 129/1 (2000), pp. 1-29.

Gleijeses, Piero: Conflicting Missions. Havana, Washington, and Africa, 1956-1976 (Chapel Hill: University of North Carolina Press, 2002).

Guimarães, Fernando Andresen: The Origins of the Angolan Civil War. Foreign Intervention and Domestic Political Conflict. (London: Macmillan Press, 1998).

Howell, Thomas A.; Rajasooria, Jeffrey P.: Ghana & Nkrumah (New York: Facts on File, 1972).

Hughes, Arnold: The appeal of marxism to Africans, Journal of Communist Studies, 8 (1992), pp. 4-20.

Kret, Abigail Judge: ‚We Unite with Knowledge‘. The Peoples’ Friendship University and Soviet Education for the Third World, Comparative Studies of South Asia, Africa and the Middle East, 33/2 (2013), pp. 239-256.

Mazov, Sergey: A Distant Front in the Cold War. The USSR in West Africa and the Congo, 1956-1964 (Standford: Standford University Press, 2010).

Nugent, Paul: Africa Since Independence. A Comparative History (New York: Palgrave Macmillan, 2004).

Poe, D. Zizwe: Kwame Nkrumah’s Contribution to Pan-Africanism. An Afrocentric Analysis (New York: Routledge, 2003).

Schmidt, Elizabeth: Foreign Intervention in Africa. From the Cold War to the War on Terror (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2013).

Steele, Jonathan: Soviet relations with Angola and Mozambique, in: Cassen, Robert (Ed.): Soviet interests in the Third World. The Royal Institute of International Affairs (London: SAGE Publications, 1985), pp. 284-298.

Webber, Mark: Angola: Continuity and change, Journal of Communist Studies, 8 (1992), pp. 126-144.

Westad, Odd Arne: The Global Cold War. Third World Interventions and the Making of Our Times (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2005).

White, Evan: Kwame Nkrumah: Cold War Modernity, Pan-African Ideology and the Geopolitics of Development, Geopolitics, 8 (2003), pp. 99-124.

Ziyi, Feng: A contemporary interpretation of Marx’s thoughts on modernity, Frontiers of Philosophy in China, 1 (2006), pp. 254-268.

[1] Marx, Karl: The Communist Manifesto, edited by Frederic L. Bender (New York: Norton & Company, 1988), p. 58.

[2] Fanon, Frantz: The Wretched of the Earth (New York: Grove Press, 2004), pp. 55-56.

[3] Ziyi, Feng: A contemporary interpretation of Marx’s thoughts on modernity, Frontiers of Philosophy in China, 1 (2006), pp. 254-268, here p. 255.

[4] Berman, Marshall: All That Is Solid Melts Into Air. The Experience of Modernity (New York: Penguin Books, 1988), p. 17.

[5] Eisenstadt, S.N.: Multiple Modernities, Daedalus, 129/1 (2000), pp. 1-29, here p. 2.

[6] Westad, Odd Arne: The Global Cold War. Third World Interventions and the Making of Our Times (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2005), pp. 52, 92.

[7] Ibid., pp. 4, 40.

[8] Nugent, Paul: Africa Since Independence. A Comparative History (New York: Palgrave Macmillan, 2004), p. 138.

[9] Westad: Global, p. 107.

[10] Hughes, Arnold: The appeal of marxism to Africans, Journal of Communist Studies, 8 (1992), pp. 4-20, here pp. 17-18.

[11] Ibid., p 5.

[12] Mazov, Sergey: A Distant Front in the Cold War. The USSR in West Africa and the Congo, 1956-1964 (Standford: Standford University Press, 2010), p. 11.

[13] Hughes: Appeal, p. 16.

[14] Schmidt, Elizabeth: Foreign Intervention in Africa. From the Cold War to the War on Terror (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2013), p. 26.

[15] Kret, Abigail Judge: ‚We Unite with Knowledge‘. The Peoples’ Friendship University and Soviet Education for the Third World, Comparative Studies of South Asia, Africa and the Middle East, 33/2 (2013), pp. 239-256.

[16] Westad: Globa,, p. 74.

[17] Ibib., p. 93.

[18] Hughes: Appeal, p. 6.

[19] Ibid., pp. 10-14.

[20] White, Evan: Kwame Nkrumah: Cold War Modernity, Pan-African Ideology and the Geopolitics of Development, Geopolitics, 8 (2003), pp. 99-124, here p. 100.

[21] Poe, D. Zizwe: Kwame Nkrumah’s Contribution to Pan-Africanism. An Afrocentric Analysis (New York: Routledge, 2003), p.2.

[22] Adi, Hakim; Sherwood, Marika: Pan-African History. Political figures from Africa and the diaspora since 1787 (London: Routledge, 2003), p. 144.

[23] Howell, Thomas A.; Rajasooria, Jeffrey P.: Ghana & Nkrumah (New York: Facts on File, 1972), p. 7.

[24] Adi: History, p. 144.

[25] Howell: Ghana, p. 12.

[26] Adi: History, p. 144.

[27] White: Nkrumah, pp. 105-106.

[28] Ibid., pp. 111-112.

[29] Howell: Ghana, pp. 62-63.

[30] White: Nkrumah, p. 113.

[31] Nkrumah, Kwame: Africa Must Unite (London: Heinemann Educational Books, 1963).

[32] Adi: History, p. 145.

[33] Pamphlet found in the African Activist Archive. URL: http://africanactivist.msu.edu/document_metadata.php?objectid=32-130-1C55.

[34] Webber, Mark: Angola: Continuity and change, Journal of Communist Studies, 8 (1992), pp. 126-144, here p. 127.

[35] Guimarães, Fernando Andresen: The Origins of the Angolan Civil War. Foreign Intervention and Domestic Political Conflict. (London: Macmillan Press, 1998), pp. 4-32.

[36] Gleijeses, Piero: Conflicting Missions. Havana, Washington, and Africa, 1956-1976 (Chapel Hill: University of North Carolina Press, 2002), pp. 246-272.

[37] Guimarães: Origins, p. 72.

[38] Webber: Angola, pp. 127-128.

[39] Speech found in the African Archivist Archive. URL: http://africanactivist.msu.edu/document_metadata.php?objectid=32-130-1188.

[40] Guimarães: Origins, p. 170.

[41] Steele, Jonathan: Soviet relations with Angola and Mozambique, in: Cassen, Robert (Ed.): Soviet interests in the Third World. The Royal Institute of International Affairs (London: SAGE Publications, 1985), pp. 284-298, here p. 289.

[42] Ibid.

[43] „Red Africa“, Calvert 22 Foundation, London, 4 Feb – 3 Apr 2016. URL: http://calvert22.org/red-africa/.

[44] Webber: Angola, pp. 130-137.

Das Krakauer Ghetto im Zweiten Weltkrieg – ein Fallbeispiel der Shoa

1939-1941: Verfolgung

Die Verfolgung der jüdischen Bevölkerung in Krakau beginnt bereits wenige Tage nach Kriegsbeginn und der Besatzung der Stadt am 06. September. Viele Juden fliehen anfangs vor den deutschen Besatzern in den Osten Polens, viele in den sowjetisch besetzten Teil des Landes, von wo viele jedoch nach kurzer Zeit wieder zurückkehren, da sie lieber das bekannte Übel wählen als die Fremde.[1] Halina Nelken, eine damals 17-Jährige Krakauer Jüdin, schreibt dazu in ihrem Tagebuch, das den Krieg und die Shoa ebenso wie sie selbst überlebt hat: „Wir beschlossen, sofort nach Hause zu fahren. Im Osten war mir alles fremd, besonders die Rote Armee. Vor den sowjetischen Soldaten in ihren langen Mänteln hatte ich Angst, auch wenn sie so schön sangen.“[2]

In der Stadt bleiben überwiegend Händler, Handwerker und Angestellte zurück, da es Teilen der assimilierten oder zionistisch orientierten Intellektuellen entweder unmittelbar vor Kriegsausbruch oder kurz danach gelingt, die Stadt und auch Polen zu verlassen. Außerdem bleiben so gut wie alle orthodoxen Juden in Krakau.[3]

Bereits zwei Tage nach der Besetzung der Stadt, am 08. September, ergeht durch SS-Oberscharführer Paul Siebert der Befehl zur Errichtung eines Judenrates. Die Auswahl der Mitglieder und die anschließende Leitung wird dem zuvor in der jüdischen Fürsorge aktiven Marek Bieberstein aufgezwungen. Der in den folgenden Tagen errichtete Judenrat stellt das Bindeglied zwischen den Besatzungsorganen und der jüdischen Bevölkerung dar, die dem Rat unterstellt ist, was jedoch nicht darüber hinwegtäuschen soll, dass er von den Besatzern, also dem Judenreferat der Gestapo, komplett abhängig ist. Für die Mitglieder des Judenrates beginnt eine Gratwanderung zwischen den deutschen Befehlen und dem Schutz der jüdischen Bevölkerung. Schnell wird eine weitverzweigte jüdische Verwaltung aufgebaut und 1940 eine eigene jüdische Polizei ausgehoben, der sogenannte Ordnungsdienst, der für Ordnung und den Streifendienst zuständig ist. Die Tatsache, dass die Teilnahme daran freiwillig und unbesoldet ist, ist mit dafür verantwortlich, dass der Ordnungsdienst zusammen mit dem gesamten Judenrat als Verräter im Zentrum der jüdischen Kritik steht.[4]

Die Vertreibung von Juden aus den direkt in das Deutschen Reich integrierten Teilen Polens führt dazu, dass auch in Krakau Wohnungsnot herrscht. Der Judenrat organisiert Notunterkünfte in Synagogen und Schulen. Trotz der Not und den bereits in den ersten Tagen vollhängten antijüdischen Verordnungen, die sich im Laufe der Besatzungszeit immer weiter verschärfen, geht für die Juden im besetzten Krakau, das nun „Hauptstadt“ des von den Deutschen errichteten Generalgouvernements ist, das Leben weiter. Gegen die immer weiter ansteigende, aus den Verordnungen resultierende Armut der jüdischen Bevölkerung werden Volksküchen eingerichtet. Besonders die ab Mitte November 1939 vollzogene Sperrung von jüdischen Konten, das Verbot des Gebrauchs des Hebräischen, das Konfiszieren von Autos und die Kennzeichnungspflicht mit dem Davidsstern machen das Leben der Juden immer schwieriger und beschwerlicher. Im Dezember 1939 kommt es zu den ersten Plünderungen und Razzien in Kasimierz, dem jüdischen Viertel von Krakau.

Es folgen weitere Verordnungen wie eine nächtliche Ausgangssperre für Juden, das Einfrieren von Renten und dem Verbot der Ausübung von intellektuellen Berufen. Besonders letztere Verordnung führt zu einer Verarmung der jüdischen Bevölkerung und raubt den Intellektuellen vor allem später im Ghetto die Lebensgrundlage bzw. verändert die komplette Sozialstruktur, in der nun handwerkliche bzw. allgemein praktische Fähigkeiten einen viel höheren Stellenwert haben.[5]

Seit Oktober 1939 herrscht zudem Arbeitszwang, Juden können nun zu jeder Arbeit gezwungen werden. Das vom Judenrat gegründete Arbeitsamt soll der jüdischen Bevölkerung Arbeit vermitteln und sorgt in manchen Fällen dafür, dass sich reichere Juden vom Arbeitszwang freikaufen können.

Die Pläne der deutschen Besatzer in Form von Generalgouverneur Hand Frank sehen für Krakau eine Vertreibung der meisten Juden vor. Vorgesehen ist, dass die 65.000 zur Jahreswende 1939/40 in Krakau lebenden Juden auf 5.000, maximal 10.000 reduziert werden sollen, die als Handwerker dringend benötigt werden, später jedoch ebenso vertrieben werden sollen.

Dem Judenrat wird daher im März 1940 befohlen, die Umsiedlung zu organisieren. Denjenigen, die bis Mitte August freiwillig gehen würden, wird zugesprochen, ihre Habe mitnehmen und einen eigenen Wohnort wählen zu können. Nach Ablauf der Frist haben jedoch „lediglich“ 22.000 Juden „freiwillig“ die Stadt verlassen. Für viele bedeutet dies nach der Vertreibung aus den annektierten Gebieten Polens die zweite Vertreibung.[6]

Halina Nelken beschreibt die Umsiedlung in ihrem Tagebuch folgendermaßen: „8. März 1941: […] In einigen Tagen sollen wir aus dem Ghetto gehen. Ich bin hier geboren, meine Mama auch. Ich schaue mich in den hellen, freundlichen und anheimelnden Räumen um … und es tut mir so leid! Wenn ich dieses Haus verlasse, werde ich, das weiß ich, unwiederbringlich etwas zurücklassen, von dem ich noch nicht genau weiß, was es ist: einen Teil meines Lebens, die sorglosen Jahre der Kindheit und das ‚Flegelalter‘?“[7] Und am 20. März beschreibt sie den Tag des ‚Umzugs‘ mit folgenden Worten: „Der Eintrag von vorgestern zeigt, wie durcheinander ich am Tag des Umzugs ins Ghetto war. Ich kämpfte mit Wehmut und Tränen, und gleichzeitig rissen Felek und ich voller Galgenhumor Witze angesichts der ‚Völkerwanderung‘. Offene Lastwagen und Möbelwagen, die mit Gerümpel überladen waren, zogen in die eine Richtung, und in der Gegenrichtung waren Polen unterwegs, denn die Bewohner dieses Teils von Podgórze mußten für uns ihre Wohnungen freimachen. Kazimierz würde auf einmal voller ‚Arier‘ sein! Felek und ich fanden das Tohuwabohu des Umzugs irrsinnig komisch.“[8]

1941/42: Im Ghetto

Die angestrebte Vertreibung geht für die Besatzer lange nicht schnell genug voran, und so geht die Vertreibung ab November 1940 besonders aggressiv von statten. Das Arbeitsamt bestimmt durch Kennkarten, wer bleiben darf. Diese Selektion ist ein wichtiger Teil der Repressionen gegen die jüdische Bevölkerung und wird bis zur Auflösung des Ghettos ein Repressionsmittel der Besatzer bleiben.

Das Scheitern der deutschen Pläne zur Vertreibung fast aller Juden aus Krakau führt schließlich im März 1941 zur Errichtung eines „Jüdischen Wohnbezirks“, also eines Ghettos im gegenüber dem jüdischen Viertel gelegenen, jedoch durch die Weichsel getrennten ärmlichen Stadtteil Podgórze, aus dem nun alle nichtjüdischen Bewohner gehen müssen. 15.000 Menschen müssen nun in einem Stadtteil leben, in dem zuvor 3.000 Platz fanden. Die dadurch hervorgerufene Wohnungs- bzw. Platznot verschlimmert sich sogar nach und nach noch. Anfang April, genau während des Pessach-Festes wird mit dem Bau einer Mauer um das Ghetto begonnen. In Form von jüdischen Grabsteinen kündigt sie den Eingeschlossenen von der nahen Vernichtung. [9]

Im Ghetto ändert sich nicht nur die Familienstruktur, in der nun beispielsweise Kinder und auch Frauen nach der Flucht vieler Väter nach Ostpolen eine immer wichtige Rolle einnehmen. Neben der sich veränderten Sozialstruktur, hervorgerufen durch das Arbeitsverbot intellektueller Berufe, herrscht auch vor allem durch die Wohnungsnot, durch die mehrere Familien in kleinen Wohnungen auf engstem Raum zusammenleben müssen, keine homogene und solidarische Gemeinschaft im Ghetto.

Trotz dieser Konflikte und der schwierigen Lage aller Ghettobewohner entwickelt sich ein Alltagsleben mit Cafés, Geschäften oder Konzerten, und auch der Talmud-Unterricht wird im Geheimen fortgesetzt.

Der Armut wird durch von der ‘Jüdischen Sozialen Selbsthilfe’ organisierte Volksküchen und einem Krankenhaus im Ghetto versucht beizukommen. Zur finanziellen Unterstützung für sozial Schwache und die Versorgung von Flüchtlingen reichen jedoch oft die Mittel nicht aus.

Im Herbst 1941 wird das Ghetto gegenüber der Außenwelt weiter abgeschottet. Juden, die sich ohne Genehmigung außerhalb der Ghettomauern aufhalten, werden erschossen. Durch eine Vertreibung von ca. 6.000 bis dahin in der näheren Umgebung Krakaus lebenden Juden ins Ghetto verschlimmert sich die Lage im Ghetto nochmals. Die Einteilung des Wohnraums geschieht durch die Anzahl der Fenster pro Raum. Oft müssen 15 Personen in einen kleinen Raum mit nur einem Fenster zusammenleben. Ende 1941 leben 18.000 Menschen im Ghetto.

Die ersten Deportationen aus dem Ghetto beginnen im November 1941. Die Besatzer erklären die Deportation durch die Überbevölkerung im Ghetto und aus Angst vor der Verbreitung von ansteckenden Krankheiten. Deportiert werden vor allem Alte und Arbeitslose, also der Teil der Ghettobewohner, die keine der begehrten, vom Arbeitsamt ausgestellten Kennkarten besitzt. 2.000 Juden werden in einen kleinen Ort im Distrikt Lublin gebracht.

Die Selektion der Ghettobewohner wird währenddessen fortgesetzt. Zur Jahreswende 1941/42 müssen alle zwischen 14 und 25 Jahre Alten eine körperliche Untersuchung über sich ergehen lassen, bei der sich wieder die Willkür der deutschen Besatzer zeigt, die zwar von Anfang an in institutionelle Bahnen gelenkt wurde, jedoch neben dieser gesetzlichen Verfolgung immer parallel weiterbesteht.

1942/43: Vernichtung

Am 30. Mai 1942 werden die Menschen im Ghetto durch Plakatanschläge über die nächste Selektion informiert, die durch einen Stempel auf den Kennkarten stattfinden soll, den lediglich 50% der Bewohner erhalten. Wer keinen Stempel erhalten hat, also wessen Arbeit nicht als kriegswichtig eingestuft wurde oder der aus anderen Gründen von den oft willkürlich selektierenden deutschen Behörden als nicht berechtigt eingestuft wurde, im Ghetto zu bleiben, soll sich am folgenden Tag auf dem Umschlagplatz versammeln. Durch vom jüdischen Ordnungsdienst und der SS durchgeführte Razzien werden etwa 2.000 Juden aus ihren Wohnungen geholt und ins Vernichtungslager Belzec deportiert, wo sie sofort nach ihrer Ankunft ermordet werden.

Weitere Selektionen folgen wenige Tage darauf statt, am 06. und 07. Juni. Wer den nötigen Schein nicht erhält, wird sofort festgenommen und am Tag darauf deportiert. Mindestens 3.000 Menschen werden an diesem Tag nach Belzec in den Tod geschickt. Innerhalb einer Woche deportieren die Deutschen 7.000 Menschen, ein Drittel der Ghettobevölkerung. Der Ordnungsdienst setzt die deutschen Befehle bei den Razzien und den Deportationen unter dem neuen Vorsitzenden des Judenrates, David Gutter, sofort und rücksichtslos durch. [10]

Am 20. Juni wird das Ghetto verkleinert, wodurch die Wohnbedingungen sich noch weiter verschlechtern.

Im selben Monat, im Juni 1942, erhält die Sicherheitspolizei die Verantwortung für die „Judenfragen“ und löst damit Hans Frank in diesen Belangen ab.

Die nun folgende Auflösung des Ghettos und die damit verbundene Errichtung des KZ Plaszow ist auf einen Beschluss Himmlers zurückzuführen, der am 19. Juli die Prämisse vorgegeben hatte, dass sich außerhalb der fünf Sammellager Warschau, Krakau, Radom, Tschenstochau und Lublin im Generalgouvernement keine Juden mehr aufhalten sollten.[11]

Der nächsten Deportation Ende Oktober 1942, bei der auch das jüdische Waisenhaus im Ghetto aufgelöst wird, fallen 7.000 Menschen zum Opfer. Viele verzweifeln angesichts der immer aussichtsloser werdenden Situation und nehmen sich das Leben. Trotzdem versuchen die Zurückgebliebenen, ein normales Leben weiterzuführen, was jedoch nur teilweise gelingt.

Nach einer erneuten Verkleinerung des Ghettos nach der Oktober-Deportation wird es schließlich im Dezember 1942 in ein Ghetto A und B aufgeteilt. In Ghetto A leben alle von den Besatzern als arbeitsfähig eingestuften Juden, in Ghetto B jene, die keinen Arbeitsnachweis haben oder erst vor kurzem aus der Krakauer Umgebung ins Ghetto gebracht worden sind.[12]

Im Zusammenhang mit der Aufteilung des Ghettos steht Himmlers oben bereits erwähnter Befehl: Alle ab 1941 bereits im Ghetto wohnenden Juden sollen nach und nach ins „Judenarbeitslager“ Plaszow „verlegt“ werden. „Dies betrifft die jüdischen Arbeitskräfte, die für die Rüstungsinspektion, die Heeresdienststellen, die Betriebe des Wehrkreisbefehlshabers und private Firmen, die kriegswichtige Aufträge ausführten, tätig waren.“[13]

Die Arbeit der Ghettobevölkerung regelt nun die SS direkt, das jüdische Arbeitsamt wird aufgelöst. Die Arbeitsnachweise müssen von den Firmen selbst eingereicht werden. Die als arbeitsfähig Eingestuften werden vielfach von ihren Familien getrennt und müssen Baracken im nahen KZ Plaszow bauen. Spätestens jetzt ist allen Juden in Krakau bewusst, welches Schicksal sie erwartet und was mit ihren deportierten Mitmenschen geschehen ist.

Die Hoffnungslosigkeit der im Ghetto eingeschlossenen wird in Halinas Tagebuch sehr deutlich. Am 15. Januar 1943 – inzwischen wohnt sie in einer Baracke außerhalb des Ghettogeländes und arbeitet auf einem Flugplatz –  schreibt sie: „Das Ghetto wird langsam, aber sicher liquidiert. Alle wissen es, und dennoch retten sich die Leute nicht. Wozu auch und wie? Wohin fliehen? Die Jüngeren können es noch riskieren, obwohl es ohne Papiere, Geld und Beziehungen schwierig ist. Die Menschen sind erschöpft, durch ihre Familien und die Kollektivhaftung gefesselt – es scheint, als warteten sie tatenlos, willenlos, resigniert, verachtungswürdig. ‚Er zittert vor Angst wie ein Jude‘, – aber es ist doch nicht nur die Angst um einen selbst, wenn jemand zittert. Ich war zweimal in einem kurzen Besuch im Ghetto, und jedesmal stelle ich verzweifelt fest, daß meine Eltern immer elender aussehen. Ich wäre so gerne wieder bei ihnen!“[14]

Die Auflösung des Ghettos findet am 13. März 1943 statt. Das Ghetto wird umstellt und die Übergänge zwischen den beiden Teilen versperrt. Alle als arbeitsfähig eingestuften müssen mit ihren Kindern über 14 Jahren ins KZ Plaszow, alle übrigen ins Ghetto B. Heillose Panik bricht aus, einigen wenigen gelingt noch die Flucht.

Am Tag darauf werden alle Kindern im Ghetto B erschossen. (Manche Mütter erfahren im KZ vom Tod ihrer eigenen Kinder, wenn sie zufällig deren Kleider verarbeiten müssen.) Die Gewalt, welche an diesem Tag von den Besatzern ausgeht, übertrifft alles bisherige. Viele Menschen werden nicht einmal mehr in ein Vernichtungslager deportiert, sondern sofort im Ghetto erschossen. Vielen wird nach einer letzten Demütigung und Erniedrigung auf dem zentralen Umschlagplatz ins Genick geschossen.

An diesen zwei Tagen deportieren und ermorden die Deutschen 3.000 Menschen, 2.000 Männer, Frauen und Kinder ermorden sie direkt im Ghetto.

Quellen

Nelken, Halina: Freiheit will ich noch erleben, Krakauer Tagebuch. Vorw. von Gideon Hausner. Aus dem Poln. von Friedrich Griese, Gerlingen 1996

Löw, Andrea; Roth, Markus: Juden in Krakau unter deutscher Besatzung 1939-1945, Göttingen 2011

Der Ort des Teorrors: Riga-Kaiserwald, Warschau, Vaivara, Kauen (Kaunas), Płaszów, Kulmhof/Chelmno, Bełżec, Sobibór, Treblinka, hrsg. von Wolfgang Benz,Barbara Distel,Angelika Königseder, München 2008

[1]Löw, Andrea; Roth, Markus: Juden in Krakau unter deutscher Besatzung 1939-1945, Göttingen 2011

[2]Nelken, Halina: Freiheit will ich noch erleben, Krakauer Tagebuch. Vorw. von Gideon Hausner. Aus dem Poln. von Friedrich Griese, Gerlingen 1996, S. 73

[3]Der Ort des Teorrors: Riga-Kaiserwald, Warschau, Vaivara, Kauen (Kaunas), Płaszów, Kulmhof/Chelmno, Bełżec, Sobibór, Treblinka, hrsg. von Wolfgang Benz,Barbara Distel,Angelika Königseder, München 2008, S. 236

[4]Löw; Roth: Juden in Krakau, S. 18ff.

[5]Löw; Roth: Juden in Krakau, S. 27ff.

[6]Ebd., S. 30ff.

[7] Nelken: Freiheit will ich noch erleben, S. 103

[8] Ebd., S. 105

[9]Löw; Roth: Juden in Krakau., S. 52ff.

[10]Löw; Roth: Juden in Krakau: S. 129ff.

[11]Der Ort des Terrors, S. 237

[12]Löw; Roth: Juden in Krakau, S. 154ff.

[13]Der Ort des Terrors, S. 238

[14] Nelken: Freiheit will ich noch erleben, S. 247

Der Weg zum “normalen” Staat. Die Außenpolitik der UdSSR vor dem Hitler-Stalin-Pakt

„Doch alles verblasste und wurde ausgelöscht vor dem Eindrucke eines winzigen Viadukts in der Tiefe, der sich über den Schienenstrang Leningrad-Reval plötzlich auf freier Strecke erhob: die Triumphpforte des roten Erdteils, das Tor, das die zwei Welten auf diesem Planeten trennt. Es durchzuckte das Schiff wie ein elektrischer Schlag, die einen mit Freude, die andern mit Haß. […] Die Grenze – jene unsichtbare Linie, die deutlicher als der Äquator, unseren Planeten in zwei Hälften teilt, zog auch durch das Schiff.“[1] Dieser Auszug aus dem Bericht des Journalisten Arthur Koestler von der 1931 mit einem deutschen Luftschiff durchgeführten Expedition in die sowjetische Arktis vermittelt die – mehr ideologische als geographische – Entfernung zwischen der UdSSR und dem kapitalistischen Rest der Welt zu Beginn der 30er Jahre.

Die Überbrückung dieser Schlucht, die Annäherung an das kapitalistische Ausland, das Drängen in das internationale Gefüge, die Errichtung eines Sicherheitssystems, das den ersten sozialistischen Staat der Geschichte vor einem gemeinsamen antikommunistischen Kreuzzug der kapitalistischen Staaten schützen sollte, also all jene Ziele der sowjetischen Außenpolitik in den 30er Jahren bis zum vieldiskutierten Hitler-Stalin-Pakt, sind jedoch undenkbar ohne die Etablierung und Selbstdarstellung der UdSSR als Staat unter Staaten. Wie die Polarforscher bei ihrem Zwischenstopp in Leningrad mit militärischen Ehren empfangen wurden, so sollten nun auch Botschafter und Politiker aus dem Ausland im Staate der Weltrevolution empfangen werden. Die Weltrevolution wurde aufgeschoben, diplomatische Kontakte geknüpft und schließlich erfolgte 1934 der Eintritt in den Völkerbund, der zunächst größte Erfolg des neuen Außenkommissars Litvinov. Zwar zerbrach der anschließend geschlossene Pakt mit Frankreich und der Tschechoslowakei durch die Appeasement-Politik Frankreichs im Münchner Abkommen, jedoch konnte sich die Sowjetunion bis zum Beginn der deutschen Aggression in den Jahren 1938/39 erfolgreich in das internationale System einfügen.

Im Rahmen dieser Arbeit soll die sowjetische Außenpolitik dieser Zeit unter dem Gesichtspunkt der Etablierung der UdSSR als in außenpolitischer Hinsicht den westlichen kapitalistischen Nationen angeglichener Staat betrachtet werden. Nach der für das Verständnis der sowjetischen Außenpolitik überaus wichtigen Darstellung von Stalins Staats-und Revolutionsverständnisses, dem sogenannten Konzept des „Sozialismus in einem Land“ sollen auf diese Weise zum einen einige der wichtigsten Ereignisse wie der bereits erwähnte Eintritt in den Völkerbund und das Bündnis mit Frankreich betrachtet werden. Zum anderen sollen auch allgemeine Tendenzen wie die Selbstdarstellung der UdSSR im Völkerbund sowie die Politik der Komintern und der außenpolitische Gehalt der neuen „Stalin“-Verfassung von 1936 analysiert werden, um zum Schluss einen Ausblick auf das Ende des maßgeblich durch Litvinov geschaffenen „Systems der kollektiven Sicherheit“ zu geben und kurz die verschiedenen Forschungsthesen um das Münchner Abkommen 1938 und vor allem den Hitler-Stalin-Pakt 1939 zu geben.

Die Zielsetzung dieser Arbeit ist also, die Außenpolitik des ersten sozialistischen Staates unter dem Gesichtspunkt zu analysieren, wie sich dieser immer weiter fortbewegte vom Ziel der Weltrevolution und zu einem etablierten Staat im internationalen Gefüge wurde, der sich lediglich durch seine innere Struktur und seine Staatsideologie von anderen Großmächten unterschied. Dieser Fokus liefert eine neue Sichtweise auf die beschriebene Epoche der sowjetischen Außenpolitik und ergänzt somit die bisherige Forschung, die sich vor allem mit der Zielsetzung der stalin’schen Außenpolitik sowie deren inneren Strukturen beschäftigt, um eine neue Perspektive.

Vorgeschichte

Auch wenn die Anfänge der sowjetischen Außenpolitik in den 20er Jahren nicht mehr in den in dieser Arbeit betrachteten Zeitraum fallen, so ist es doch sinnvoll, in einigen wenigen Sätzen zwar nicht die Ausgangslage der sowjetischen Politik, doch zumindest die für das Thema der Arbeit wichtigen Aspekte zu umreißen. Diese sind vor allem die diplomatische bzw. völkerrechtliche Anerkennung der Sowjetunion als Staat bzw. der Bolschewiki als rechtmäßige Regierung und das Litvinov-Protokoll, also das vorläufige Inkrafttreten des Briand-Kellog-Paktes zwischen der UdSSR und seinen europäischen Nachbarstaaten als ersten Schritt zu einer Eingliederung in das Staatengefüge.

Die diplomatische Anerkennung

Spätestens nach dem Scheitern des Aufstandes der KPD im deutschen Reich im Jahre 1923, dem ‚deutschen Oktober‘, stand die Führung der Bolschewiki vor einem scheinbar unlösbaren Problem: in keinem anderen Staat der Welt[2] hatten Kommunisten die Macht erringen können, die von Marx beschworene Weltrevolution hatte nur in Russland gesiegt, ausgerechnet im unindustrialisiertesten und deshalb laut Marx dafür ungeeignetsten aller europäischer Staaten[3]. Nach dem Scheitern der Revolution in Deutschland 1918/19, auf der die größten Hoffnungen gelegen hatten, nahmen die Bolschewiki zu ebenjenem Staat Kontakt auf, allerdings nicht wie erhofft mit ihren deutschen Genossen, sondern mit einer bürgerlichen Regierung. Der 1922, also ein Jahr vor dem vorerst letzten Revolutionsversuch, abgeschlossene Vertrag von Rapallo normalisierte die Beziehungen zwischen den beiden aus dem Völkerbund ausgeschlossenen und international isolierten Staaten.[4]

Da 1923 für die Bolschewiki die erhoffte Weltrevolution vorerst weit entfernt schien, musste ein Ausweg aus dem dauerhaften Dilemma gesucht werden. „Ein modus vivendi musste deshalb gefunden werden, der es unter diesen Umständen ermöglichte, dauerhaft ein Nebeneinander von sozialistischem und kapitalistischem System, eine Art ‚friedliche Koexistenz‘, zu gewährleisten.“[5] Der Schlüssel dazu war die Aufnahme von diplomatischen Beziehungen mit Großbritannien im Jahre 1924, was eine ganze Folge von Anerkennungen anderer Staaten zur Folge hatte.[6]

Die Aufnahme von diplomatischen Beziehungen war nicht allein aufgrund der damit verbundenen Aufhebung der internationalen Isolierung von Nutzen, sondern diente vor allem der wirtschaftlichen Entspannung und schaffte einen Zugang zu den für die Neuordnung der Wirtschaft im Rahmen der NEP (=Neue Ökonomische Politik) nötigen Waren.[7]

Während diese Wirtschaftsbeziehungen weiter ausgebaut wurden, kam es im Laufe der 20er Jahre zu immer größeren Spannungen zwischen der UdSSR und den westlichen Mächten, was schließlich nach Schauprozessen gegen britische Spezialisten in der UdSSR 1927 zum vorläufigen Abbruch der diplomatischen Beziehungen mit London durch die konservative britische Regierung führte.[8]

Die Wiederaufnahme der diplomatischen Beziehungen mit London 1929 war vor allem durch die sowjetische Industrialisierung und die Weltwirtschaftskrise begründet. Die britische Verhandlungsseite sah sich bereit, Stalins Forderung nach einer sofortigen Wiederanerkennung nachzugeben und angesichts der Lage der eigenen Wirtschaft in der Krise[9] über das noch immer ungeklärte Schuldenproblem zwischen den beiden Staaten[10] hinwegzusehen. Die diplomatischen wie wirtschaftlichen Beziehungen mit der UdSSR wurden also wiederaufgenommen, was von deren Seite her wie gesagt vor allem unter dem Gesichtspunkt der Industrialisierung und der dafür benötigten westlichen Güter und Investitionen vorangetrieben wurde.[11] Die Beziehungen zwischen den beiden Staaten blieben dennoch überaus angespannt, was ein Vorfall im Jahre 1933 zeigt, als mehrere britische Angestellte von Metro-Vickers in der UdSSR festgenommen und der Spionage und Sabotage angeklagt wurden, was eine neue anti-sowjetische Kampagne in Großbritannien hervorrief und ein Handelsembargo gegen sowjetische Güter zur Folge hatte.[12]

Die wichtigste nun noch fehlende Anerkennung, nämlich durch die USA, erfolgte 1933 und stellte einen der größten diplomatischen Erfolge des sowjetischen Außenkommissars Litvinov und des NKID[13] dar[14]. Jedoch dauerten die guten Beziehungen nicht lange an, und auch der von amerikanischer Seite erhoffte Export-Boom in die UdSSR, für den eigens die Export-Import-Bank gegründet worden war, blieb aus.[15]

Der erste und in gewisser Weise damit wichtigste Schritt hin zur Etablierung der UdSSR als „Staat unter Staaten“ und zu ihrer Einführung in das internationale Mächtesystem, die diplomatische Anerkennung als Nachfolgestaat des Zarenreiches, war also einerseits stark von Wirtschaftsinteressen dominiert, was die schlechten Beziehungen zu London, aber auch Washington zeigen, und löste in gewisser Weise das Grundproblem der russischen Kommunisten nach dem Scheitern der Revolution vor allem in Deutschland, indem sie dem ersten und vorerst einzigen sozialistischen Staat der Erde die Möglichkeit bot, in einen ‚modus vivendi‘ mit den kapitalistischen Staaten einzutreten.

Das Litvinov-Protokoll

Das 1929 von der UdSSR, Polen, Rumänien, Lettland, Estland, etwas später auch von Litauen und der Türkei unterzeichnete Abkommen, das den Verzicht auf Gewalt in zwischenstaatlichen Konflikten bedeutete, kann als erster Schritt hin zu Litvinovs „System der kollektiven Sicherheit“ gesehen werden und wird stets als sein erster großer Erfolg angesehen. Ohne auf die genauen Hintergründe des Vertrages einzugehen, wie dies beim Eintritt in den Völkerbund gemacht werden wird, liefert der Vertrag doch ein bedeutendes Ergebnis für diese Arbeit.

Wichtig im Zusammenhang mit diesem Pakt ist die viel beschriebene Kriegsangst Stalins und generell großer Teile der Parteiführung am Ende der 20er Jahre. Ein Vertrag mit den europäischen Nachbarstaaten zum gegenseitigen Gewaltverzicht kann somit als Reaktion auf die Angst vor der Einkreisung und einem antikommunistischen Kreuzzug gesehen werden.[16]

Die Initiative des neuen Außenkommissars Litvinovs[17] zum vorläufigen Inkrafttreten des Briand-Kellogg-Paktes ist nicht nur von sicherheitspolitischer Relevanz, sondern stellt auch den ersten Kontakt mit Rumänien und Polen, also den Staaten des französischen Bündnissystems her. Mit Rumänien bestanden vormals keine diplomatischen Beziehungen aufgrund der ungelösten Bessarabien-Frage, und damit war auch der Kontakt zur „Kleinen Entente“ (Rumänien, Tschechoslowakei und Jugoslawien) zuvor unmöglich gewesen. Litvinovs Verdienst besteht also nicht nur in der Etablierung eines Sicherheitssystems, sondern auch in der Durchbrechung der internationalen Isolierung und einem ersten Schritt in Richtung des späteren Paktes mit Frankreich und der Tschechoslowakei, denn man hatte in Moskau eingesehen, „dass der Weg nach Warschau [als damaligem Hauptziel der europäischen Sicherheitspolitik der UdSSR] zu jener Zeit noch über Paris führen musste.“[18]

Dem Abschluss des Litvinov-Protokolls folgten die Paraphierung eines Nichtangriffspaktes mit Frankreich im August 1931 und anschließend die gewünschten Nichtangriffspakte mit Finnland, Estland und vor allem mit Polen. Mit der Unterzeichnung des Nichtangriffspaktes mit Frankreich 1932 wurde ein „Frontwechsel zu einer antirevisionistischen Politik vollzogen und eine neue internationale Konstellation in Mitteleuropa vorbereitet.“[19]

Entscheidend für das Thema der Arbeit sind vor allem zwei Punkte: die Initiative für das Litvinov-Protokoll und die Nichtangriffspakte gingen von sowjetischer Seite aus und zeigen somit das Bedürfnis nach Sicherheit des sowjetischen Staates als vordergründiges außenpolitisches Ziel. Zudem kommt es zu einer Akzeptanz des vorher so verhassten Versailler Systems, zu einer Annäherung an die Staaten des „Cordon Sanitaire“ und damit letztlich auch an Frankreich, also dem späteren Partner von 1935.

Das Konzept des „Sozialismus in einem Land“

Die Idee bzw. das Konzept des „Sozialismus in einem Land“ existiert offiziell zwar erst ab 1926, jedoch beschreibt es Stalins Vorstellungen bereits vor dem Tode Lenins recht gut. Bereits 1924 hatte er diesen Gedanken zum ersten Mal formuliert. Isaac Deutscher stellt den Prozess der Entwicklung dieser Theorie in seiner Stalin-Biographie jedoch als reine Abgrenzung zu Trockijs Konzept der „Permanenten Revolution“ und Stalin als in dieser Frage im Grunde zunächst unentschlossen dar, was sich in einer Broschüre Stalins noch Anfang 1924 zeige, in der er feststelle, „dass das Proletariat zwar in einem bestimmten Lande die Macht an sich reißen könne, dass es aber keine sozialistische Wirtschaft in diesem eigenen Lande schaffen könne.“[20] Der Umschwung hin zum Konzept des „Sozialismus in einem Land“ bedeutete also die angestrebte Verwirklichung des Ziels der sozialistischen Wirtschaft als Wirtschaft des Überflusses durch eine Industrialisierung innerhalb der UdSSR, die für Stalin aufgrund der Kontrolle der proletarischen Regierung über Industrie und Banken und die natürlichen Reserven des Landes möglich sei. Da Marx‘ Analysen sich in der Praxis nicht bewahrheiteten, die Revolution setze sich in den fortschrittlichsten und am weitesten industrialisierten Staaten durch und ermögliche durch die Nutzung dieser Industrie durch eine proletarische Herrschaft den Kommunismus, mussten diese Voraussetzungen eben nun mit eigenen Anstrengungen geschaffen werden.[21]

In einer Rede vom 9. Juni 1925 schließlich spricht Stalin über die Möglichkeit des Aufbaus des Sozialismus in einem Lande. Darin stellt er den Aufbau des Sozialismus in der UdSSR nicht nur als durchführbar, sondern als „notwendig und unausbleiblich“ dar. Zwar gesteht er zu, dass der bereits angelaufene sozialistische Aufbau durch den „Sieg des Sozialismus im Westen“ erleichtert würde, jedoch werde dieser Sieg nicht so schnell erreicht. Der Erfolg der Errichtung einer sozialistischen Wirtschaft hänge dabei von der „Stärke bzw. Schwäche unserer Feinde und unserer Freunde außerhalb unseres Landes ab.“ Nur wenn die „Periode der ‚Atempause‘“ verlängert werden könne und es zu keiner Intervention komme bzw. diese erfolgreich abgewehrt werden könne, könne das Projekt Erfolg haben.“[22]

Das Verwerfen von Trockijs Konzept der „permanenten Revolution“ und der Fokus auf den wirtschaftlichen Aufbau ist nicht nur für das weitere Selbstverständnis des ersten sozialistischen Staates als ‚sowjetischer Nationalstaat‘ mit einer vorerst nicht auf Weltrevolution, sondern auf Konsolidierung ausgerichteten Außenpolitik immanent, sondern bildet auch die Grundlage für die Eingliederung der UdSSR in die internationale Staatengemeinschaft. Zwar schwor auch Stalin dem Endziel der Weltrevolution nicht ab, und durch die Komintern und die Kontakte zu den KP anderer Staaten besaß die sowjetische Außenpolitik in den 30er Jahren trotzdem noch eine internationalistische Komponente, jedoch ermöglichte die neue Zielsetzung, – nicht zuletzt durch die Botschaft, die die neue Losung an die kapitalistischen Staaten sandte – den Kontakt mit im Grunde genommen feindlichen Staaten aufzunehmen und schuf dadurch auch die Voraussetzung für die unter anderem von Stalin in seiner Rede geforderte „Atempause“.

Mit dem Konzept des „Sozialismus in einem Land“ sind aber wie oben dargestellt nicht nur die Aufschiebung der Revolution und die Ausrichtung der sowjetischen Außenpolitik verbunden, sondern vor allem die gewaltigen inneren Umwälzungen, die sogenannte „Revolution von oben“. Konkret sind damit also die Kollektivierung der Landwirtschaft und die Industrialisierung gemeint, die im Rahmen des ersten Fünf-Jahresplans vorangetrieben wurden und eng verbunden waren mit den Repressionen gegen die sowjetische Bevölkerung. Letztendlich festigten diese Maßnahmen, der sowjetische ‚große Sprung nach vorne‘, nicht nur Stalins Macht, sondern auch die des sowjetischen Staates insgesamt, festigen somit auch das Konzept des sowjetischen ‚Nationalstaates‘ und ermöglichen die spätere Hegemonie über die anderen Staaten des Warschauer Paktes.

Der Eintritt in den Völkerbund

Ziele und Konzeption des Eintritts in den Völkerbund

Zunächst soll nun der Frage nachgegangen werden, welche Ziele hinter dem Eintritt in den Völkerbund standen und somit ein erster Entwurf der Zielsetzung bzw. der Konzeption der sowjetischen Sicherheitspolitik ausgearbeitet werden, der im folgenden Kapitel über den Pakt mit Frankreich, erweitert werden soll.

Jonathan Haslam betont in seiner Analyse des sowjetischen Bestrebens nach einem System der kollektiven Sicherheit in Europa in den 30er Jahren die sowjetische Kriegsangst als entscheidenden Faktor für den Eintritt in den Völkerbund.[23] Der Frieden war in seiner Lesart nicht allein Voraussetzung für das Fortbestehen des sowjetischen Staates bzw. Systems insgesamt, sondern insbesondere für die Industrialisierung. Der erste Fünf-Jahresplan war zwar bis 1932 in nur vier Jahren vorläufig beendet worden, jedoch war dies erst der erste Schritt des Wandels vom Agrar- zum Industrieland, also einem der großen Ziele der stalin’schen Politik und wie bereits dargestellt ein wichtiger Teil der ‚Staatswerdung‘ im Zusammenhang mit dem Konzept des „Sozialismus in einem Land“. Da bis 1938 Probleme bei der Mobilisierung auftraten und die Industrialisierung im Bereich der Rüstung erst langsam Erfolge zeigte, wurde von Litvinov ein System propagiert, in dem durch gegenseitige Absicherung der Existenz des anderen, also Nichtangriffspakte mit anderen Staaten sowie eine Forcierung der internationalen Abrüstung, die Existenz der UdSSR als unabhängiger Staat gesichert werden könne.[24]

Die Annäherung an den Westen war in wirtschaftspolitischer Hinsicht jedoch nicht allein deshalb wichtig, weil somit der für die Industrialisierung notwendige Frieden länger aufrechterhalten werden konnte, sondern vor allem brauchte die sowjetische Wirtschaft Ausrüstung und Güter aus dem Westen, wofür die Weltwirtschaftskrise aus sowjetischer Sicht die Voraussetzung war.[25]

Neben der wirtschaftlichen Situation ist aber auch die internationale Situation bzw. das Mächtegerüst 1933/34 wichtig für das Verständnis der Beweggründe und Ziele des Eintritts in den Völkerbund bzw. das dahinter stehende sicherheitspolitische Konzept. Natürlich nimmt Deutschland hierbei eine Sonderrolle, wenn nicht gar die alles entscheidende Rolle ein. Die Ernennung Hitlers zum Reichskanzler 1933 stellt ein einschneidendes Ereignis für die sowjetische Außen- und Sicherheitspolitik dar. Zwar betonte Hitler Anfang 1933 mehrmals, er wolle die Beziehungen zur UdSSR nicht verändern, jedoch wurde nach einigen Monaten das Ende der Rapallo-Beziehungen deutlich, worauf gleich näher eingegangen wird. Ein erstes Anzeichen hierfür stellen zum Beispiel die Übergriffe auf sowjetische Botschaften und Handelsvertretungen dar.[26]

Die Forschung liefert mehrere mehr oder weniger konträre Thesen bezüglich des deutsch-sowjetischen Verhältnisses nach 1933. Umstritten ist, wie stark die sowjetischen Bemühungen um eine Annäherung an Deutschland nach dem mehr oder weniger sichtbaren Bruch 1933 waren, der durch den Abschluss des deutsch-polnischen Nichtangriffspakts 1934 seinen deutlichsten Ausdruck fand.[27] Eine Reihe von westlichen Historikern widersprach der offiziellen sowjetischen Geschichtsschreibung, die in der sowjetischen Außenpolitik der 30er Jahre ein ernsthaftes und aufrechtes Vorgehen gegen die deutsche Aggression sahen. Aus Sicht dieser Historiker[28] „[…] the real foreign policy of the USSR is not to be found in the impassioned speeches of Litvinov at Geneva, but rather in the covert contacts with Berlin by Karl Radek, David Kandelaki, Sergei Bessonov and others. In this light, the Nazi-Soviet Pact is seen not as a regrettable alternative necessitated by the failure of the Collective Security campaign, but as the ultimate achievement of the real aim of that campaign.”[29]

Der eben zitierte Teddy Uldricks sieht das Verhältnis zu den faschistischen Staaten weder als Abwendung aus ideologischen Gründen noch als geheime Diplomatie zwecks der Vorbereitung eines gemeinsamen Paktes oder Bündnisses. Den oft nicht ganz eindeutigen Charakter der sowjetischen Außenpolitik der 30er Jahre macht er am Beispiel der Politik gegenüber Japan deutlich: „Soviet policy in that arena contained both measures of resistance to Japanese aggression and elements of appeasement of Tokyo. The USSR shipped considerable military aid to Nationalist China, but refused to sign a mutual assistance pact with Nanking; it massively reinforced the Sino-Soviet Border, but also sold the Chinese Eastern Railway to Japan.“[30] Aber auch im Falle Italiens widerlegt er einen konsequenten Antifaschismus der sowjetischen Politik, ebenso wie beim vorläufigen Ende der guten Beziehungen mit Deutschland, das nicht etwa in einer – moralisch bzw. ideologisch begründeten – Abwendung vom Nationalsozialismus begründet liegt, sondern in der Zurückweisung der sowjetischen Angebote durch Berlin. Die Autorisierung der neuen Strategie der „Kollektiven Sicherheit“ erfolgte demgemäß auch erst am 20. Dezember 1933.[31] Die bereits erwähnten Geheimkontakte und die damit verbundene Kritik an der traditionellen sowjetischen Deutung bzw. Geschichtsschreibung leugnet er zwar nicht, gewährt ihnen aber keinen so großen Stellenwert wie die oben erwähnten Historiker, vor allem aufgrund des gewaltigen personellen Unterschiedes: „The problem with this contention is that three unoffficial and tentative feelers [gemeint sind damit die Geheimkontakte Radeks, Kandelakis und Bessonovs mit Berlin] can scarcely tip the scales against the weight oft he Collective Security campaign pursued with vigour from late 1933 to 1939.“[32]

Ebenso wie ins Uldricks Analyse enden auch für den bereits mehrfach zitierten George Haslam die deutsch-sowjetischen Beziehungen 1933 vorerst und sind der Hauptgrund für die Hinwendung zum Westen: „Ultimately, and despite the oppostion aroused in Moscow at the mention of any dramatic change, it was growing German hostility that drove the USSR in a direction that many mistrusted.“[33] Das Ende der guten Beziehungen stellt in seiner Analyse eine Rede Hugenbergs auf der Weltwirtschafskonferenz am 14. Juni 1933 dar, bei der er deutschen Lebensraum im Osten und gleichzeitig ein Ende der Lebensbedingungen in der UdSSR forderte. Kurz darauf wird die am 20. Juni des Jahres verstorbene Clara Zetkin medienwirksam auf dem Roten Platz beigesetzt und die militärische Zusammenarbeit im Rahmen des Rapallo-Vertrages beendet.[34]

Das Ende der Rapallo-Politik ist für die sowjetische Außenpolitik von enormer Bedeutung. Von Lenin entworfen, stellte sie einen der Grundpfeiler der Außenpolitik bis zum Machtwechsel in Deutschland 1933 dar. Interessanterweise nimmt die Politik der beiden ehemaligen Rapallo-Partner bezüglich des internationalen Systems die genau entgegengesetzte Richtung an. Während Hitler 1933 aus dem Völkerbund austritt, entschließt sich die UdSSR dazu, die internationale Isolation zu durchbrechen und ins internationale Staatengefüge einzutreten.

Die Verhandlungen

Nachdem nun die Motive der sowjetischen Führung für einen Eintritt in den Völkerbund als wichtigstes Zeichen einer Annäherung an den Westen und eine Einbindung in das internationale Mächtesystem beschrieben wurden, ist es nun auch wichtig, die vorhergehenden Verhandlungen zu betrachten. Dabei fällt zunächst auf, dass die Aufnahme in den Völkerbund mit dem sowjetischen-französischen Pakt des Jahres 1935 parallel verläuft. Wie im folgenden Kapitel über diesen Pakt soll hier nun anhand einiger ausgewählter Quellen der Quellensammlung „Politbjuro ZK RKP(b) – BKP(b) i Evropa. Reschenie ‚osoboj papki‘ 1923-1939“, also einer Aktensammlung aus den Sondermappen des Politbüros, die Aufnahme in den Völkerbund näher beleuchtet werden, um so diesen für diese Arbeit eminenten Punkt besser zu verstehen.

Nachdem in den ersten Jahren nach 1930 vor allem die wirtschaftlichen Beziehungen mit England, Frankreich, Deutschland und Italien im Zusammenhang der beschriebenen Materiallieferungen und Investitionen für die sowjetische Industrialisierung die Politbürobeschlüsse zur Europapolitik dominieren, findet sich in diesen sogenannten „Sondermappen“ auch die Zustimmung zum schließlich gescheiterten Projekt eines „Pan-Europa“, also ein erster Versuch der Eingliederung in ein internationales System. Dieses Projekt ging vom französischen Außenminister Briand aus und war kurz ausgedrückt die Idee einer föderalen Vereinigung der europäischen Völkerbundsmitglieder. Obwohl die UdSSR und die Türkei somit von dem Projekt ausgeschlossen wurden, gab es einen deutsch-italienischen Vorschlag, diese beiden Nationen trotzdem in die Verhandlungen mitaufzunehmen.[35] Die sowjetische Führung stimmte der Teilnahme an der entsprechenden Kommission am 10. April 1931 zu.[36] Obwohl das Projekt letztendlich scheiterte, zeigt es doch die sowjetische Bereitschaft, nach dem Litvinov-Protokoll einer Einbindung in ein gesamteuropäisches System zuzustimmen, auch wenn hierbei die Initiative nicht von der sowjetischen Seite aus ging.

Wie bereits dargestellt, kann man die sowjetisch-französische Annäherung und die Aufnahme in den Völkerbund nicht voneinander trennen. Die beiden Seiten hatten bereits 1932 wie bereits erwähnt einen Nichtangriffspakt abgeschlossen und ab August 1933 regelte ein geheimes französisch-sowjetisches Protokoll die Wirtschaftsbeziehungen und erlaubte französische Kredite für den Ankauf französischer Industriegüter zum Zwecke der bereits erwähnten Industrialisierung sowie der Ankurbelung der krisengeschüttelten französischen Wirtschaft.[37] Die Zusammenarbeit erhält jedoch 1933 durch den Machtwechsel in Deutschland eine neue Qualität.

Davon zeugt ein Dokument vom 19. Dezember 1933, worin dem Polpred[38] in Frankreich, Valerian Saveljevič Dovgalevskij, Direktiven für die Antwort an den französischen Außenminister Paul-Boncour gegeben werden. Dieser hatte nach dem deutschen Völkerbundsaustritt im Oktober 1933 Dogalevskij über die Möglichkeit einer gemeinsamen Zusammenarbeit der beiden Staaten informiert. Die französische Seite bestand jedoch auf dem Abschluss eines Paktes im Rahmen des Völkerbundes.[39] Laut des Dokuments sollte Dovgalevskij der französischen Seite unter anderem mitteilen, die UdSSR sei einverstanden mit einer Aufnahme in den Völkerbund, mit dem Abschluss einer regionalen Vereinbarung über gegenseitige Verteidigung im Falle eines Angriffs Deutschlands und mit der Aufnahme von Belgien, Frankreich, der Tschechoslowakei, Polen, Litauen, Lettland, Estland und Finnland oder einiger dieser Staaten in diesen Pakt, aber auf jeden Fall von Frankreich und Polen. Außerdem sollten sich die Vertragsparteien unabhängig von den Bestimmungen der Abmachung verpflichten, sich gegenseitig diplomatisch, moralisch und wenn möglich materiell zu helfen bei einem Angriff, den der Vertrag nicht einschließt.[40] Am 18. September 1934 kam es dann schließlich zur offiziellen Aufnahme in den Völkerbund. Ein weiterer Schritt aus der Isolierung war gegangen.

Die Verbindung der beiden Punkte, dem Eintritt in den Völkerbund und dem Pakt mit Frankreich, macht ein Schreiben eines 1934 in der französischen Botschaft in der UdSSR arbeitenden Paillards[41] an Litvinov deutlich, in dem er ihn an die unauflösliche Verbindung der Aufnahme in den Völkerbund und der sich in Verhandlung befindenden Pakte erinnert.[42]

Deshalb soll im nächsten Kapitel diese Betrachtung fortgesetzt werden und anschließend ein gemeinsames Ergebnis in Bezug auf das Thema der Arbeit und die ihr zugrunde liegende These formuliert werden.

Die wichtigste Erkenntnis aus der Analyse des Eintritts in den Völkerbund ist wohl, dass die Aufnahme in den Völkerbund zwar den sowjetischen Sicherheitsinteressen diente und sie die auf Wirtschaftskontakte mit dem Westen basierende Industrialisierung – also das wohl wichtigste Projekt der Sowjetführung – sicherte, die Initiative zur Aufnahme in den Bund – also nicht mehr nur der Teilnahme von sowjetischen Vertretern bei Abrüstungsverhandlungen in Genf – von Frankreich aus ging, was wiederum nur aus dem Machtwechsel in Deutschland und dem damit verbundenen deutschen Austritt aus dem Völkerbund resultierte.

Bündnisse mit kapitalistischen Staaten

Freilich ist das Bündnis bzw. der Pakt mit Frankreich und der Tschechoslowakei von 1935 nicht die erste Annäherung an einen kapitalistischen Staat, denkt man an den Vertrag von Rapallo von 1922 mit dem Deutschen Reich, der die beiden „Außenseiter“ im internationalen System, die beiden aus dem Völkerbund ausgeschlossenen Staaten einander annäherte. Jedoch beschränkte sich dieser Vertrag auf die Normalisierung der gegenseitigen Beziehungen. Selbst wenn man die militärische Zusammenarbeit dazurechnet, die im Rahmen dieses Vertrages stattfand, gleicht dieser Vertrag nicht dem militärischen Pakt für gegenseitige Hilfe, der 1935 mit Frankreich abgeschlossen wurde. Dieser Pakt ist also ein Novum in der sowjetischen Geschichte und stellt somit auch nach dem Eintritt in den Völkerbund eine wichtige Kehrtwende dar: zum ersten Mal geht die kommunistische Sowjetunion ein militärisches Bündnis mit zwei kapitalistischen Staaten ein. Dies kann man als einen der wichtigsten Schritte hin zur Etablierung der UdSSR im internationalen System ansehen, da das Bündnis mit kapitalistischen Regierungen im Grunde aus revolutionärer Sicht einen Widerspruch darstellte. Nicht nur, dass die sowjetische Führung im Völkerbund und auf diplomatischem Wege Kontakt zu den kapitalistischen Staaten aufnahm, nun befand sie sich im offenen Bündnis mit diesen.

Zunächst soll die Vorgeschichte des Paktes betrachtet werden, die die Bemühungen der Sowjetregierung um ein festes sicherheitspolitisches Bündnis aufzeigt und schließlich das Ergebnis dieser Verhandlungen, der Pakt von 1935, betrachtet werden.

Das Projekt „Ostpakt“

Wie bereits bei der Analyse des Dokuments vom 19. Dezember 1933 deutlich wurde, war der Pakt mit Frankreich und der Tschechoslowakei, wie er 1935 abgeschlossen wurde, nicht als Pakt zwischen explizit diesen drei Staaten geplant gewesen, sondern entwickelte sich gewissermaßen aus Gesprächen bzw. Verhandlungen über einen Regionalpakt in Europa, die wie gesehen von 1933 bis 1935 andauerten.

Wichtig für die Analyse der sowjetisch-französischen Verhandlungen ist zunächst eine Rede Stalins auf dem 17. Parteikongress im Januar 1934, in der er sowohl eine Orientierung auf Deutschland als auch eine Orientierung auf Polen und Frankreich verneint. Die Orientierung in der Vergangenheit und in der Gegenwart liege allein auf der UdSSR. Noch am Tag der Rede bezeichnete die Direction politique des französischen Außenministeriums die Aussage, Paul-Boncour strebe einen Beistandspakt an, als falsch.[43] Dass Frankreich dennoch vorerst die einzig verbliebene Macht für ein Sicherheitsbündnis in Europa war, wurde nach der Zurückweisung eines sowjetischen Vorschlags der beiderseitigen deutsch-sowjetischen Erklärung der Unabhängigkeit der baltischen Staaten durch Berlin klar: „Having once more tested the water to see whether Rapallo could be resurrected in some form, the Russians recoiled from Berlin, aware that the French option was all that was now open to them.“[44] Und tatsächlich kam im April die französische Zustimmung zu weiteren Verhandlungen. Die Schwierigkeiten lagen nun darin, dass die sowjetische Seite Paris dazu bringen wollte, ganz Osteuropa in den Pakt miteinzubeziehen. Die Franzosen wollten dagegen ihre Verpflichtungen so gering wie möglich halten und widerriefen ihre zu Beginn der Verhandlungen gemachte Zusage, die baltischen Staaten in den Pakt aufzunehmen, aufgrund ihres Verbündeten Polen.[45]

Im Juni 1934 stimmt die sowjetische Führung dann dem britischen Wunsch zu, in die Planungen um das Projekt „Ostpakt“ – im westlichen Sprachgebrauch auch als „östliches Locarno“ bezeichnet – sowie in die bilateralen Verhandlungen zwischen der UdSSR und Frankreich auch Deutschland einzuschließen.[46]

Das Scheitern des Projektes „Ostpakt“ liegt schließlich auch in der deutschen und polnischen Absage begründet. Bereits Ende September 1934 wurde deutlich, dass sich der deutschen Absage auch die polnische Regierung anschließen werde, um die polnisch-deutschen Abmachungen, also konkret den im Januar desselben Jahres abgeschlossenen bereits erwähnten Nichtangriffspakt zwischen den beiden Staaten, nicht zu gefährden.[47] Als Reaktion auf diese negative Haltung der deutschen und polnischen Regierung zu dem geplanten Pakt beschloss das Politbüro schließlich am 23. November 1934, die Gespräche auch ohne Deutschland und Polen weiterzuführen, auch wenn die Initiative dazu nicht überhastet geschehen solle.[48]

Gerade die Bereitschaft, wenn auch nicht Initiative, Deutschland in ein Sicherheitssystem einzubinden, zeigt, dass die Zielsetzung der sowjetischen Außenpolitik in den Jahren 1933 bis 1935 nicht etwa allein auf der Ausgrenzung des potentiellen deutschen Aggressors lagen, sondern die Aufrechterhaltung des Friedens und damit des Systems von Versailles in Europa das oberste Ziel darstellte. Dafür war die sowjetische Führung bereit, Sicherheitspakte nicht nur mit kapitalistischen Staaten, sondern auch mit dem nationalsozialistischen Deutschland einzugehen bzw. sah diese Pakte als Teil des „Systems der kollektiven Sicherheit“ an und förderte sie.

Der Pakt mit Frankreich und der Tschechoslowakei 1935

Kurz nach der erwähnten Absage der deutschen und polnischen Seite an das Projekt „Ostpakt“ kam auf die sowjetischen Verhandlungsführer eine weitere Herausforderung zu: Das Attentat auf den französischen Außenminister Barthou am 9. Oktober 1934 in Marseille bedeutete zunächst einen Rückschlag für die Verhandlungen um den Beistandspakt, da Barthous Nachfolger Pierre Laval ein Abkommen mit Deutschland als für den Frieden in Europa überaus wichtig erachtete, worunter die Gespräche mit Moskau über den nun um Deutschland und Polen reduzierten Pakt deutlich litten.[49]

Im zuletzt betrachteten Dokument vom 23. September 1934 wurde bereits die sowjetische Zustimmung dazu deutlich, den geplanten Sicherheitspakt auch ohne Deutschland und Polen durchzuführen, dies jedoch nicht zu überstürzen. Nur ein paar Tage später schließlich, am 02. November, wurde vom Politbüro auf Anfrage des NKID entschieden, auch einen kleineren Pakt abzuschließen, also ohne Berlin und Warschau, wenn Frankreich und die Tschechoslowakei oder auch nur Frankreich dem zustimmten.[50]

Was auf diese Entscheidung folgte, war eine längere, mehrere Monate lang andauernde Phase, in der das Projekt nicht recht vorankam, da Paris versuchte, die Zusagen an Moskau möglichst gering zu halten. Schließlich wurde ein Kompromiss geschlossen und der Pakt am 2. Mai 1935 unterzeichnet. Dem folgte am 16. Mai die Unterzeichnung des sowjetisch-tschechoslowakischen Paktes, der sich nur in dem Punkt von dem französisch-sowjetischen Pakt unterschied, dass die Hilfe für die Tschechoslowakei oder die UdSSR durch die jeweils andere Vertragspartei davon abhing, ob Frankreich zuerst handelte bzw. wie Frankreich sich entschied zu handeln.[51] In Moskau wurde der Pakt mit Frankreich mit großem Unmut aufgefasst und bei vielen als Enttäuschung empfunden.

Jonathan Haslam, dessen Analyse der sowjetischen Bemühungen um ein System der kollektiven Sicherheit für die Analyse der Verhandlungen um den Pakt mit Frankreich in dieser Arbeit neben der Betrachtung einiger weniger Akten des Politbüros die Grundlage bildet, schließt das Kapitel über den Pakt mit Frankreich mit folgender These: „Instead of removing Soviet anxieties, the signature of the pact only whetted the Soviet appetite for further guarantees; thus the pact did not substitute for attempts to revive Rapallo. Instead it became a bargaining counter held in reserve for future negotiations with Berlin.“[52]

Der Abschluss des sowjetisch-französischen Paktes für gegenseitige Unterstützung war also keineswegs ein von beiden Seiten gleichermaßen gewolltes und mit gleicher Energie und den gleichen Zielen vorangebrachtes Projekt. Vielmehr zeigt die Geschichte der Verhandlungen um den Pakt, dass sich die sowjetische Sicherheitspolitik nach dem Machtwechsel in Deutschland nicht nur auf die Eingliederung in das internationale Mächtesystem, also den Völkerbund, stützte, sondern eine Partnerschaft mit einem der stärksten kapitalistischen Staaten als Sicherheitsgarant für die Verhinderung eines antikommunistischen Kreuzzuges und des Aufbaus des „Sozialismus in einem Land“ angestrebt wurde, was jedoch wiederum von französischer Seite aus nur durch den Eintritt in den Völkerbund möglich war.

Selbstdarstellung der UdSSR nach außen

Litvinovs Reden im Völkerbund

Die Selbstdarstellung der UdSSR nach außen hin geschieht neben den Botschaftskontakten zu einem hohen Grad durch die Institution des Völkerbundes. Bereits vor dem Eintritt in denselben 1934 konnten sowjetische Delegationen an vom Völkerbund einberufenen Konferenzen teilnehmen[53]. In den frühen 20er Jahren entsprechen die offiziellen Äußerungen sowjetischer Politiker jedoch der negativen sowjetischen Auffassung des Völkerbundes als „Koalition von Kapitalisten“.[54]Ab 1927 ist im Zusammenhang mit der anfangs beschriebenen Öffnung nach Westen auch eine Annäherung an den Völkerbund erkennbar. Zu diesem Zeitpunkt trat die UdSSR auch der „Vorbereitenden Kommission für die Abrüstungskonferenz“ bei, was Litvinov, damals an der Spitze der sowjetischen Delegation, die erste Möglichkeit bot, wortgewandt für Frieden und Abrüstung zu werben und ein positives Bild der Sowjetunion zu zeichnen.[55] Diese Bemühungen werden teilweise natürlich durch die oben erwähnten Prozesse gegen ausländische Ingenieure und die außenpolitische Wirkung der antikapitalistischen Propaganda zunichte gemacht. Dennoch gelingt es, zumindest in Frankreich die antikommunistische Einstellung vieler Politiker zumindest abzuschwächen und nach der Kontaktaufnahme mit den meisten westlichen Staaten sich selbst so gut darzustellen, dass ein Pakt und eine Aufnahme in den Völkerbund möglich werden. Dabei darf man auch nicht vergessen, dass die Losung des „Sozialismus in einem Land“ auch eine starke außenpolitische Wirkung besaß und eine friedliche Koexistenz, also auch Kooperation zwischen kapitalistischen Staaten und der sozialistischen UdSSR ermöglichte.

Nach dem Eintritt in den Völkerbund kann Litvinov wie bereits erwähnt in den Sitzungen des Völkerbundrates durch seine Reden das Bild der friedliebenden Sowjetunion ausbauen und seine Ideen des unteilbaren Friedens und des Systems der kollektiven Sicherheit verbreiten. Die geringe Wirkung von Litvinovs Appellen, „sich zum Schutze der Unabhängigkeit der Bundesmitglieder und gegen eine Ausbreitung der faschistischen Aggression zusammenzuschließen“ [56], am sichtbarsten an der Tatenlosigkeit der internationalen Gemeinschaft im spanischen Bürgerkrieg oder in der Abessinien-Krise, kann eine Erklärung sein für den nächsten Schritt der Annäherung an den Westen, die neue Verfassung von 1936.[57]

Stalin-Verfassung 1936: Annäherung durch „Assimilation“

Der Beschluss der neuen Verfassung fand ein Jahr nach Unterzeichnung des Paktes mit Frankreich statt, die Ausarbeitung wurde bereits kurz zuvor, am 6. Februar, beschlossen.[58] Nachdem der Pakt wie gezeigt am Ende nicht ganz den sicherheitspolitischen Vorstellungen der sowjetischen Führung entsprochen hatte, kann man die neue Verfassung als weiteren Annäherungsversuch an den Westen sehen. Die Bedrohung durch Japan in der Mandschurei und das nationalsozialistische Deutschland hatte durch den 1936 zwischen diesen Staaten abgeschlossenen Antikomintern-Pakt noch zugenommen, vor allem durch die während der Verkündung des Paktes durch die Führer der Achsenmächte stattfindenden Zusammenstöße an der sowjetisch-japanischen Grenze.[59]

Der neue, scheinbar demokratische und liberale Charakter der neuen Verfassung liegt vor allem in der starken Rolle des Parlaments, des Obersten Sowjets, begründet. Zudem tritt der starke Föderationscharakter der Union zutage. Den sowjetischen Bürgern wird das Wahlrecht und auch andere demokratische Rechte zugesprochen. Die politische Realität wird jedoch im Artikel 126 widergespiegelt, in dem es heißt, dass sich die Bürger in der Kommunistischen Partei vereinigen können, die „[…] der Vortrupp der Werktätigen in ihrem Kampf für den Aufbau der kommunistischen Gesellschaft ist und den leitenden Kern aller Organisationen der Werktätigen, der gesellschaftlichen sowohl wie der staatlichen, bildet.“ Außerdem heißt es in Artikel 141, dass lediglich die Partei die Kandidaten für die Wahl aufstellen kann. Nach außen hin lieferte die neue Verfassung also demokratische Rechte und ein demokratisches Wahlsystem, genauer betrachtet bildet die Verfassung aber in den beiden benannten Artikeln die Wirklichkeit recht gut ab.[60]

In liberalen und linksgerichteten Kreisen im Westen wurde die generelle Tendenz der sowjetischen Außenpolitik ab 1935 positiv aufgefasst, von der neuen Ausrichtung der Komintern über die offene Parteinahme der sowjetischen Regierung für die spanische Republik bin hin zur neuen Verfassung.[61]

Volksfronttaktik der Komintern – verschobene Revolution

Die Rolle der Komintern wird in der Forschung als für die sowjetische Außenpolitik nicht allzu groß bzw. bedeutend angesehen. Vielmehr wird betont, dass sie ein reines Werkzeug Stalins war und ihre internationale Rolle auf eine Unterstützung der übrigen außenpolitischen Instrumente des sowjetischen Apparats degradiert wurde. Die Abhängigkeit der in Moskau sitzenden Organisation von ihrem ‚Gastland‘ wird besonders in den ‚Großen Säuberungen‘ deutlich, unter denen die Komintern „als Hort trotzkistischer Feinde“ besonders zu leiden hatte.[62] Unter dem Begriff der ‚Bolschewisierung‘ wurde ab dem V. Weltkongress 1924 die Tendenz der völligen Abhängigkeit der Komintern-Parteien von der KPdSU deutlich.[63]

Die ab 1928 geltende Losung der Komintern für die kommunistischen Parteien im kapitalistischen Rest der Welt war ebenjene berüchtigte These des „Sozialfaschismus“, welche die Sozialdemokratie als den größeren Feind als den aufkommenden Faschismus ansah und den vor allem für Deutschland so folgenschweren Grabenkampf zwischen KPD und SPD bis 1933 zur Folge hatte.

Eine erste Ausnahme von dieser Losung wurde aufgrund besorgniserregender Vorgänge in Paris am 6. Februar 1934 gewährt: Nachdem faschistische Kräfte im Zuge des Stavinsky-Skandals die linke Regierung abzusetzen drohten, beteiligte sich die Kommunistische Partei Frankreichs nach einem Entschluss in Moskau an einem Generalstreik der Sozialistischen Partei; gleichzeitig, ebenso im Februar 1934, kam es zum Aufstand sozialistischer Milizen gegen die Installation des Dollfuss-Regimes in Österreich.[64] Die Einheitsfront-Regierung in Frankreich, deren Zustandekommen auf diesen Ereignissen fußte, bildete ein deutliches Zeichen für einen Umschwung in der Kominternpolitik.[65]

Der einflussreiche Kominternpolitiker und ab 1935 Generalsekretär der Organisation, der Bulgare Georgij Dimitrov, der nach diesen Ereignissen von der Notwendigkeit einer Kurskorrektur der Kominternpolitik überzeugt war, konnte seine Ansichten erfolgreich dem sowjetischen Politbüro vorschlagen. Auch wenn Stalin anfangs noch wenig überzeugt war, stimmte das Politbüro schließlich für die neue Strategie und ebnete Dimitrov daraufhin auch den Weg zur Führung der Komintern.[66]

Der VII. Komintern-Kongress im Jahre 1935 brachte dann schließlich die richtungsweisende Veränderung für die – mehr ideologisch als tatsächlich in der Politik der einzelnen Staaten erfolgreiche – kommunistische Internationale. Die ultralinke Richtung, der Aufruf zum Kampf gegen die Sozialdemokratie als wichtigste Stütze der Bourgeoise, wurde fallen gelassen für eine neue Losung, die den Kampf gegen den Faschismus an oberste Stelle rückte und die Bildung von Volksregierungen als wünschenswertes Ziel anstrebte, was faktisch einen Aufschub der revolutionären Bemühungen der einzelnen kommunistischen Parteien bedeutete.

Auch wenn der Entschluss für die neue Losung sicherlich mit den Ereignissen in Frankeich und Österreich, vor allem natürlich aber auch der Machtübergabe an die Nationalsozialisten 1933 zusammenhing, passte das neue Konzept perfekt zum parallel stattfindenden Aufbau von Litvinovs „System der kollektiven Sicherheit“. „Both the Narkomindel and the Comintern’s strategy were a response to the same threat; collective security and Popular Front were twins.“[67]

Die Kurskorrektur in der Kominternpolitik und damit auch der Beziehungen der Sowjetunion zu den anderen kommunistischen Parteien ist neben dem Eintritt in den Völkerbund und dem Pakt mit Frankreich ein weiterer maßgeblicher Einschnitt in die internationalistische Politik der UdSSR. Von nun an stand auch die Politik der Kommunisten außerhalb der sowjetischen Grenzen ganz unter dem neuen Ziel der Friedenssicherung, und damit auch der von der kommunistischen Bewegung bisher so bekämpften Friedensordnung von Versailles. Wie verhängnisvoll die „Sozialfaschismus“-Losung auch besonders im Falle Deutschlands war und wie sinnvoll die Kursänderung für uns heute erscheinen mag, so stellt sie doch definitiv die Abkehr von Lenins Konzept des internationalistischen Kampfes für die Weltrevolution dar. „World revolution was put off for better times.“[68]

Ausblick: München 1938 und Moskau 1939: Das Scheitern der Westbindung

Der Ribbentrop-Molotov-Pakt, der hier nur in einem Ausblick betrachtet werden soll, stellt in vielen Punkten einen Bruch in der sowjetischen Außenpolitik dar: das Bündnis mit dem nationalsozialistischen und erklärten antikommunistischen Diktator des „Dritten Reiches“, die Expansion in der Zusammenarbeit mit demselben in die ehemaligen Gebiete des Zarenreiches, die Ersetzung Litvinovs durch Stalins treuen Gefolgsmann Molotov als Außenkommissar, der „Verrat an der Sache“.

Auf einer anderen Ebene aber kann man den Pakt auch als Kontinuität betrachten: die neue Großmacht UdSSR, die den Weg des Sozialismus eingeschlagen und die Weltrevolution vertagt hat, die in den Völkerbund eingetreten ist und Beistandspakte mit kapitalistischen Staaten abgeschlossen hat, die ihre Industrialisierung unter anderem durch ein auf die Friedensordnung von Versailles gestütztes „System der kollektiven Sicherheit“ und Kredite, Ingenieure und Material aus den kapitalistischen Staaten ermöglicht hat, die sich im Völkerbund als friedliebend und durch die neue Verfassung sogar demokratisch dargestellt hat, geht gewissermaßen den letzten Schritt. Sie sieht die beste Möglichkeit des weiteren Friedens für die UdSSR und den gleichzeitig größten Machtzuwachs in einem Pakt mit Deutschland und holt sich das „verloren gegangene“ ehemalige russische Gebiet zurück, nun vollständig in die Arena der anderen Großmächte eingetreten, die sich jedoch immer noch in einigen markanten Punkten von diesen unterscheidet.

Der Pakt mit Hitler liegt naturgemäß im Mittelpunkt zahlreicher Forschungsarbeiten. Da der Fokus dieser Arbeit auf der Zeit vor dem Pakt liegt, dieser aber dennoch als Abschluss der betrachteten Phase eminent ist, sollen die wichtigsten Forschungsrichtungen, Ansätze und Thesen vorgestellt werden, ohne dabei den Anspruch an Vollständigkeit der Zusammenfassung der, wie gesagt, zahlreichen Literatur zu dem Thema zu erheben.

Die Beurteilung des Hitler-Stalin-Paktes schließt stets die vorhergehenden Jahre mit ein und erstellt so ein Gesamtkonzept der Außenpolitik unter Stalin. Dabei geht es vor allem um die Bewertung des Systems der „kollektiven Sicherheit“. Wie bereits in Kapitel 4) über den Eintritt in den Völkerbund dargestellt, hält eine Denkrichtung alle hier teilweise vorgestellten Bemühungen um die Sicherung des Friedens und die Annäherung an die Westmächte für die Tarnung der eigentlichen Bemühungen der sowjetischen Außenpolitik, einem Bündnis mit Deutschland. Für Vertreter dieser Richtung, darunter Robert C. Tucker oder Gerhard Weinberg[69], bestand die wahre sowjetische Außenpolitik dieser Jahre aus Geheimkontakten zum Deutschen Reich und nicht in den pazifistischen Reden Litvinovs vor dem Völkerbund oder dem Sicherheitspakt mit Frankreich. In dieser Sichtweise ist schließlich der Pakt mit Hitler kein Fehltritt einer auf den Westen und den Friedenserhalt ausgerichteten Außenpolitik, sondern der Erfolg der in Wahrheit verfolgten Ziele. Teil dieser Theorie ist auch die These, der Große Terror habe die Ausschaltung des antideutsch bzw. antifaschistisch eingestellten Teils des sowjetischen bürokratischen Apparates zum Ziel gehabt und sollte somit den Weg zum Pakt mit Hitler ebnen. Dieser Deutung der Säuberungen widerspricht u.a. Teddy Uldricks und kritisiert, die Opfer des NKVD-Terrors seien keinesfalls allein unter den antideutsch eingestellten Teilen des sowjetischen Apparats zu finden.[70]

Auch die Sudetenkrise 1938 ist für das Verständnis des Paktes von 1939 wichtig. Silvio Pons sieht in der Krise nicht nur ein Scheitern der westlichen Außenpolitik, sondern betont ebenso die Passivität der sowjetischen Politik in der Krise: „The Czech crisis soon proved that the Soviet Union lacked the will and the means to play a significant role in European affairs: Moscow retreated still further from the international stage.“[71] Gestützt durch die Beschlüsse des Paktes von 1935 habe die sowjetische Führung nach der in der Angst vor einem neuen Krieg in Europa begründeten französischen Absage keine Eigeninitiative ergreifen wollen. Zwar habe Litvinov bis zuletzt versucht, einen europäischen Krieg zu verhindern, in den seiner Meinung nach die UdSSR unwillkürlich mit hineingezogen werden würde, wie ein Telegramm an Stalin zeigt, in dem er ihn zur Mobilisierung als wirkungsvolle Maßnahme gegen Hitlers Expansionsdrang bewegen wollte.[72] Jedoch lag die Entscheidungsgewalt nicht in seiner Hand und sein Drängen auf aktive Unterstützung Prags wurde nicht in Taten umgesetzt.

Donald O’Sullivan sieht in der sowjetischen Politik während der Sudetenkrise keine allein durch die französische Haltung motivierte Passivität. In seiner Analyse der sowjetischen Außenpolitik vom Münchner Abkommen bis zum deutschen Angriff 1941 sieht er die Zielsetzung der sowjetischen Führung in einer militärischen Auseinandersetzung Deutschlands mit Prag und den Westmächten, was er vor allem durch eine geheime Rede Ždanovs in Prag im August 1938 begründet, in der dieser vor kommunistischen Funktionären die positiven Folgen eines möglichen Krieges erläutert, nämlich das Ende von Faschismus wie Kapitalismus. In einem solchen Kampf stünde die Rote Armee dann auf Seiten der tschechoslowakischen Genossen.[73] Der französische Vertragsbruch erleichtere laut O’Sullivan diese Haltung lediglich.

Ein weiterer Streitpunkt ist das Interesse Stalins oder genereller der sowjetischen Führung am Feld der Außenpolitik. Viele frühere Arbeiten betonen das außenpolitische Desinteresse Stalins an Themen der Außenpolitik und die Fixierung auf die in den 30er Jahren viel wichtigeren Themen wie Industrialisierung, Zwangskollektivierung der Landwirtschaft und schließlich Sicherung der totalen Macht durch die Säuberungen ab 1936/37.[74]

Um die Jahrtausendwende entstanden eine Reihe weiterer Forschungsarbeiten zum Thema der sowjetischen Außenpolitik, darunter die hier oft zitierten Arbeiten von Donald O’Sullivan oder Viktor Knoll. Diese betonen zum einen die Handlungsmöglichkeiten der Beamten des NKID und Litvinovs, zum anderen widerlegen sie die These der Außenpolitik als wenig beachtetes oder hinter der Innenpolitik weit zurückstehendes Feld der Politik, wie auch Robert Service in seiner 2004 erschienen Stalin-Biographie[75]. Durch die Analyse neu zugänglicher Dokumente machen sie deutlich, dass sich Stalin über jede noch so kleine außenpolitische Begebenheit stets informieren ließ und über die Außenpolitik bestens informiert war[76]. In den spannungsgeladenen Jahren 1938/39 sehen sie eine große Flexibilität der sowjetischen Außenpolitik. „Weniger langfristige und detaillierte Planungen bestimmten die sowjetische Außenpolitik zu der Zeit, sondern die kontinuierlichen Neueinschätzung des internationalen Kräfteverhältnisses und die ständige Anpassung des eigenen Instrumentariums an die wechselnden Umstände.“[77], schreibt O’Sullivan. Der Pakt mit Hitler ist hier weder das über Jahre verfolgte Ziel noch bedauerlicher Fehler einer langfristig auf eine Annäherung an den Westen festgelegten Politik, sondern Ergebnis eines Abwägens zwischen einem Bündnis mit den Westmächten oder mit Hitler. Nach monatelangen parallel geführten Geheimverhandlungen mit beiden Seiten entschloss sich Stalin schließlich für Hitler, der ihm die von den Westmächten versagten baltischen Staaten und Ostpolen zusicherte.

Fazit

Die Eingliederung in das internationale System und der Prozess der Anpassung der Außenpolitik an westliche oder auch nur ‚traditionelle‘ Maßstäbe lief wie in dieser Arbeit gezeigt in mehreren Schritten ab. Nachdem durch die diplomatische Anerkennung der meisten Staaten ab 1924 zum einen die Grundlage für den Kontakt mit den kapitalistischen Staaten gelegt wurde und der wirtschaftliche Aufbau durch Investitionen und Güter aus diesen Staaten gewährleistet war, gelang schon 1929 durch das Litvinov-Protokoll und die darauf folgenden Nichtangriffspakte ein erster sicherheitspolitischer Vertrag und eine Annäherung an die europäischen Nachbarstaaten. Das Konzept des „Sozialismus in einem Land“ bildet dann die ideologische Grundlage für die Verschiebung der Weltrevolution, die staatlich durchgesetzte massive Industrialisierung und Kollektivierung der Landwirtschaft im ersten Fünf-Jahres-Plan. Außerdem werden durch dieses Konzept des ‚sowjetischen Nationalstaates‘ die Einbindung in das internationale Mächtesystem und die Pakte mit kapitalistischen Staaten legitimiert. Der erste sozialistische Staat der Geschichte nimmt somit einen seinen eigenen Weg, nähert sich aber außenpolitisch nach der revolutionären Phase immer weiter den traditionellen Maßstäben an.

Der Eintritt in den Völkerbund 1934 und damit verbunden der Pakt mit Frankreich und der Tschechoslowakei 1935 bilden schließlich die Fortführung der ersten beiden Punkte und schließen – mit der Ausnahme von Rapallo – die nach der Revolution entstandene Schlucht zwischen den kapitalistischen Staaten und ihrem ersten sozialistischen Pendant. Der prowestliche Litvinov konnte die UdSSR dem Westen annähern und durch den Kontakt mit den ausländischen Regierungen das von ihm präferierte „System der kollektiven Sicherheit“ etablieren. Die langen und komplizierten Verhandlungen im Zusammenhang um den Völkerbundseintritt und den Pakt zeigen klar den Fokus der sowjetischen Außenpolitik auf dem Erhalt des Friedens und damit auch des zuvor bekämpften Versailler Friedenssystems, wodurch der Erhalt der Wirtschaftsbeziehungen und damit der Aufbau des Sozialismus ermöglicht und ein Angriff auf die UdSSR verhindert werden sollten. Dieses Ziel spiegelt auch die 1935 an die Verhältnisse in Europa angepasste Komintern-Politik wider, die den Aufruf zur Weltrevolution durch die Forderung von Volksregierungen zusammen mit den zuvor bekämpften Sozialdemokraten bzw. gemäßigten Sozialisten zum Erhalt des Friedens und der Eindämmung des Faschismus ersetzte. Die friedensliebende Selbstinszenierung im Völkerbund und die scheinbare Demokratisierung durch die neue Verfassung von 1936 ergänzen dieses Bild und zeigen den starken Wunsch nach Annäherung an den Westen nach der ‚Einkreisung‘ durch die faschistischen Mächte Deutschland und Japan.

Quellen

Primärquellen

Политбюро ЦК РКП(б) – ВКП(б) и Европа. Решения «особой папки» 1923 – 1939, Moskau 2001

Bodo Dennewitz, Die Verfassungen der modernen Staaten, Gildenverlag Hamburg 1947

Koestler, Arthur: Von weißen Nächten und roten Tagen, Wien 2013

Marx, Karl: Zur Kritik der politischen Ökonomie, In: Marx, Karl; Engels, Friedrich: Werke, Berlin 1971

Stalin, J.W.: Fragen und Antworten, Rede am 9. Juni 1925, In: Werke, Bd. VII, Berlin (Ost) 1952 ff.

Stalin, I.W.: Werke, 16 Bde, Band 14: Februar 1934 – April 1945, Dortmund 1976

Sekundärquellen

Albertini, Rudolf von: Zur Beurteilung der Volksfront in Frankreich (1934-1938), In: Vierteljahrsheft für Zeitgeschichte 7 (1959)

Creuzberger, Stefan: Stalin. Machtpolitiker und Ideologe, Stuttgart 2009

Der Große Ploetz, Die Enzyklopädie der Weltgeschichte. 35., völlig neu bearbeitete Auflage, Freiburg im Breisgau 2008

Deutscher, Isaac: Stalin. Eine politische Biographie, Berlin 1989

Girault, René: Wirklichkeit und Legende in den französisch-sowjetischen Beziehungen 1917-1945, In: Niedhart, Gottfried (Hrsg.): Der Westen und die Sowjetunion. Einstellungen und Politik gegenüber der UdSSR in Europa und in den USA seit 1917, Paderborn 1983

Haslam, Jonathan: The Soviet Union and the struggle for Collective Security in Europe, 1933-39, London und Basingstoke 1984

Kennan, George F.: Sowjetische Außenpolitik unter Lenin und Stalin, Stuttgart 1961

Knoll, Viktor: Das Volkskommissariat für Auswärtige Angelegenheiten im Prozess außenpolitischer Entscheidungsfindung in den zwanziger und dreißiger Jahren, In: Zwischen Tradition und Revolution. Determinanten und Strukturen sowjetischer Außenpolitik 1917-1941, herausgegeben von Ludmila Thomas und Viktor Knoll, Stuttgart 2000

Markert, Werner: Von der Oktoberrevolution zur „Revolution von oben“. Zur politischen Struktur des Stalinismus, In: Vierteljahrsheft für Zeitgeschichte, 2 (1954)

Niedhart, Gottfried: Die Sowjetunion in der britischen Urteilsbildung 1917-1945, In: Niedhart: Der Westen und die Sowjetunion. Einstellungen und Politik gegenüber der UdSSR in Europa und in den USA seit 1917, Paderborn 1983

O’Sullivan, Donald: „Je später man uns um Hilfe bittet, desto teurer wird man sie uns bezahlen“ – die sowjetische Außenpolitik zwischen dem Münchner Abkommen und dem 22. Juni 1941“ in: Zwischen Tradition und Revolution. Determinanten und Strukturen sowjetischer Außenpolitik 1917-1941, hrsg. Von Ludmila Thomas und Viktor Knoll, Stuttgart 2000

O’Sullivan, Donald: Stalins „Cordon sanitaire“. Die sowjetische Osteuropapolitik und die Reaktionen des Westens 1939 – 1949, Paderborn, München u.a. 2003

Pfeil, Alfred: Der Völkerbund. Literaturbericht und kritische Darstellung seiner Geschichte, Darmstadt 1976

Plettenberg, Ingeborg: Die Sowjetunion im Völkerbund 1934 bis 1939. Bündnispolitik zwischen Staaten unterschiedlicher Gesellschaftsordnungen in der internationalen Organisation für Friedenssicherung: Ziele, Vorraussetzungen, Möglichkeiten, Wirkungen, Köln 1987

Pons, Silvio: Stalin and the inevitable war, 1936-1941, London 2002

Schröder, Hans-Jürgen: Von der Anerkennung zum kalten Krieg. Die USA und die Sowjetunion 1933-1947, In: Niedhart, Gottfried (Hrsg.): Der Westen und die Sowjetunion. Einstellungen und Politik gegenüber der UdSSR in Europa und in den USA seit 1917, Paderborn 1983

Service, Robert: Stalin, A Biography, London, Basingstoke und Oxford 2004

Uldricks, Teddy J.: Soviet Security Policy in the 1930s, In: Gorodetsky, Gabriel (Hrsg.): Soviet Foreign Policy, 1917-1991. A Retrospective, London 1994

Weber, Hermann: Die Kommunistische Internationale. Eine Dokumentation, Hannover 1966

[1] Koestler, Arthur: Von weißen Nächten und roten Tagen, Wien 2013, S. 28

[2] Mit Ausnahme der auf internationaler Ebene eher unbedeutenden Mongolei

[3] Siehe hierzu das Vorwort zu: Marx, Karl: Zur Kritik der politischen Ökonomie, In: Marx, Karl; Engels, Friedrich: Werke, Berlin 1971

[4] Creuzberger, Stefan: Stalin. Machtpolitiker und Ideologe, Stuttgart 2009, S. 209 ff.

[5] Ebd., S. 220

[6] Großbritannien folgen noch 1924 Italien, Österreich, Griechenland, Norwegen, Schweden, China, Dänemark, Mexiko, Frankreich und Japan. Siehe: Der Große Ploetz, Die Enzyklopädie der Weltgeschichte. 35., völlig neu bearbeitete Auflage, Freiburg im Breisgau 2008, S. 1134 f.

[7] Kennan, George F.: Sowjetische Außenpolitik unter Lenin und Stalin, Stuttgart 1961, S. 265 ff.

[8] Knoll, Viktor: Das Volkskommissariat für Auswärtige Angelegenheiten im Prozess außenpolitischer Entscheidungsfindung in den zwanziger und dreißiger Jahren, In: Zwischen Tradition und Revolution. Determinanten und Strukturen sowjetischer Außenpolitik 1917-1941, herausgegeben von Ludmila Thomas und Viktor Knoll, Stuttgart 2000, S. 125

[9] Kennan: Sowjetische Außenpolitik, S.309

[10] Die Bolschewiki weigerten sich, die Schulden der zaristischen Regierung in Großbritannien zu übernehmen; Siehe Kennan: Sowjetische Außenpolitik, S. 310, S. 316 f. und S. 274 oder Niedhart, Gottfried: Die Sowjetunion in der britischen Urteilsbildung 1917-1945, In: Niedhart: Der Westen und die Sowjetunion. Einstellungen und Politik gegenüber der UdSSR in Europa und in den USA seit 1917, Paderborn 1983, S. 107

[11] Хлевнюк, Олег: 1930.1933 гг., In: Политбюро ЦК РКП(б) – ВКП(б) и Европа. Решения «особой папки» 1923 – 1939, Moskau 2001, S. 209

[12] Haslam, Jonathan: The Soviet Union and the struggle for Collective Security in Europe, 1933-39, London und Basingstoke 1984, S. 17 ff.

[13] Narodny kommissariat innostrannych del (Volkskommissariat für äußere Angelegenheiten)

[14] Knoll: Das Volkskommissariat, S. 139

[15] Schröder, Hans-Jürgen: Von der Anerkennung zum kalten Krieg. Die USA und die Sowjetunion 1933-1947, In: Niedhart, Gottfried (Hrsg.): Der Westen und die Sowjetunion. Einstellungen und Politik gegenüber der UdSSR in Europa und in den USA seit 1917, Paderborn 1983, S. 180 f.

[16] Knoll: Das Volkskommissariat, S. 127

[17] Maksim Maksimovič Litvinov löste 1930 Čičerin als Außenkommissar ab

[18] Markert, Werner: Von der Oktoberrevolution zur „Revolution von oben“. Zur politischen Struktur des Stalinismus, In: Vierteljahrsheft für Zeitgeschichte, 2 (1954), S. 70

[19] Ebd., S. 70 f.

[20] Deutscher, Isaac: Stalin. Eine politische Biographie, Berlin 1989, S. 366

[21] Ebd., S. 369 f.

[22] Stalin, J.W.: Fragen und Antworten, Rede am 9. Juni 1925, In: Werke, Bd. VII, Berlin (Ost) 1952 ff., S. 173 ff.

[23] Haslam: The Soviet Union, S. 1

[24] Ebd., S. 1 f.

[25] Хлевнюк, Олег: 1930.1933 гг., In: Политбюро ЦК РКП(б) – ВКП(б) и Европа. Решения «особой папки» 1923 – 1939, Moskau 2001, S. 209

[26] Haslam: The Soviet Union, S. 11

[27] Creuzberger: Stalin, S. 225

[28] Siehe beispielsweise Tucker, Robert C.: Stalin in Power: The Revolution from above, 1928-1941, New York 1990

[29] Uldricks, Teddy J.: Soviet Security Policy in the 1930s, In: Gorodetsky, Gabriel (Hrsg.): Soviet Foreign Policy, 1917-1991. A Retrospective, London 1994, S. 66

[30] Ebd., S. 66

[31] Ebd., S. 67

[32] Ebd., S. 68

[33] Haslam: The Soviet Union, S. 11

[34] Ebd., S. 19 f.

[35] Политбюро ЦК РКП(б) – ВКП(б) и Европа. Решения «особой папки» 1923 – 1939, Moskau 2001, Dok. 140, S. 235 f.

[36] Ebd., Dok. 149, S. 245

[37] Girault, René: Wirklichkeit und Legende in den französisch-sowjetischen Beziehungen 1917-1945, In: Niedhart, Gottfried (Hrsg.): Der Westen und die Sowjetunion. Einstellungen und Politik gegenüber der UdSSR in Europa und in den USA seit 1917, Paderborn 1983, S.127 f.

[38] Polpred = Polnomočnyj Predstavitel (=bevollmächtigter Vertreter) entspricht einem Botschafter

[39] Политбюро ЦК РКП(б) – ВКП(б) и Европа, S. 306, zitiert nach: „Documents Diplomatiques Francais, 1932-1939, I Serie. V. Paris 1970. Doc. № 84, P. 165“

[40] Ebd., Dok. 207, S. 305 f. Hier lässt sich beispielshaft das oben beschriebene Prinzip der Ausarbeitung durch das NKID und die Beschlusskraft des Politbüro aufzeigen: am 12. Dezember fällt das Politbüro eine Resolution für die kollektive Sicherheit. Daraufhin wird das Narkomindel beaufragt, einen entsprechenden Entwurf vorzulegen, der am 19. Dezember schließlich angenommen wird, wodurch schließlich Litvinovs ursprüngliche Idee angenommen wurde. Siehe hierzu: Haslam: The Soviet Union, S. 29

[41] Aus dem Dokument sind keine näheren Informationen zu dieser Person ersichtlich, auch die französische Schreibweise kann hier nur erraten werden (original Пайяр)

[42] Ebd., S. 314, zitiert nach: Dokumenty vneshnej politiki SSSR, T. XVII., S. 495

[43] Haslam: The Soviet Union, S. 34 f.

[44] Ebd., S. 37

[45] Ebd., S. 38

[46] Политбюро ЦК РКП(б) – ВКП(б) и Европа, Dok. 214, S. 313

[47] Ebd., S. 318

[48] Ebd., Dok. 218, S. 318

[49] Haslam: The Soviet Union, S. 43 f.

[50] Политбюро ЦК РКП(б) – ВКП(б) и Европа, Dok. 219, S. 318

[51] Ebd., S. 49 ff.

[52] Ebd., S. 51

[53] Bereits 1922 kam es zur Teilnahme einer sowjetischen Delegation an der Internationalen Konferenz über Fragen der Hygiene und Seuchenbekämpfung in Warschau, die vom Völkerbund einberufen worden war. Siehe dazu: Pfeil, Alfred: Der Völkerbund. Literaturbericht und kritische Darstellung seiner Geschichte, Darmstadt 1976, S. 92 f.

[54] Ebd., S. 92

[55] Ebd., S. 122 f.

[56] Plettenberg, Ingeborg: Die Sowjetunion im Völkerbund 1934 bis 1939. Bündnispolitik zwischen Staaten unterschiedlicher Gesellschaftsordnungen in der internationalen Organisation für Friedenssicherung: Ziele, Vorraussetzungen, Möglichkeiten, Wirkungen, Köln 1987, S. 515

[57] Ebd., S. 513 ff.

[58] Deutscher: Stalin, S. 460 f.

[59] Ebd., S. 538

[60] Zum Text der Verfassung siehe: Bodo Dennewitz, Die Verfassungen der modernen Staaten, Gildenverlag Hamburg 1947, S. 191-214

[61] Kennan: Sowjetische Außenpolitik, S. 395 ff.

[62] O’Sullivan, Donald: Stalins „Cordon sanitaire“. Die sowjetische Osteuropapolitik und die Reaktionen des Westens 1939 – 1949, Paderborn, München u.a. 2003, S. 56

[63] Weber, Hermann: Die Kommunistische Internationale. Eine Dokumentation, Hannover 1966, S. 20

[64] Haslam: The Soviet Union, S. 35

[65] Albertini, Rudolf von: Zur Beurteilung der Volksfront in Frankreich (1934-1938), In: Vierteljahrsheft für Zeitgeschichte 7 (1959), S. 1 f.

[66] Haslam: The soviet Union, S. 54

[67] Ebd., S. 59

[68] Ebd., S. 59

[69] Siehe Tucker, Robert C.: Stalin in Power. The Revolution from above. 1928-1941, New York 1990 oder Weinberg, Gerhard: The Foreign Policy of Hitler’s Germany, Vol. I, Diplomatic Revolution in Europe 1933-1936 und Vol. II, Starting World War II, 1937-1939, Chicago 1980

[70] Uldricks: Soviet Security Policy, S. 69

[71] Pons, Silvio: Stalin and the inevitable war, 1936-1941, London 2002, S. 126

[72] Pons: Stalin and the inevitable war, S. 132 f.

[73] O’Sullivan: Je später man uns bittet, S. 161 f.

[74] Über diese Denkrichtung siehe: O’Sullivan: Stalins “Cordon Sanitaire“, S. 49

[75] Service, Robert: Stalin, A Biography, London, Basingstoke und Oxford 2004, S. 381

[76] O’Sullivan: Je später man uns bittet, S. 166

[77] Ebd., S. 173

The Rif War and French interwar imperial modernity

Paris possessed a twofold identity in the modern era: it was the “capital of modernity”[1], which was inseparably linked to the French revolution and the consequences it had on European politics and thought and, at the same time, already during the revolution also an “(Anti-) Imperial Metropolis”[2], governing parts of every continent and home of people from all over the world, especially so in the interwar period, when it became both the centre of anti-imperialism and an empire which had even increased its global influence. In the following, two sides of the changing national and at same time imperial identity, or imperial modernity, of this French metropolis in the interwar period will be analysed. The first one we call “banal imperialism”, following Billig’s concept of “banal nationalism”[3]. It manifested itself in the different ways the citizens of the metropole could come in contact with their colonial empire: they could taste it in the form of food from the colonies; they could see it in the form of posters, adverts and colonial cinema or in forms of the pavilions of the 1931 exhibition, which will be a constant throughout the essay; they could hear about it in the radio; they could follow Tintin to his adventures to Africa; or they could experience it with all five senses by travelling the colonies themselves. This colonial experience, however, is connected to the politics concerning the most striking influence of the colonies on the metropole, immigration, which will serve as a transition to the second part, the political debate about the Rif war of 1925-26, thus the discourse about the most obvious and most violent side of French imperialism. Here we will compare four different views from the press to show the different positions French politics and the public had on this topic. Both sides of this imperial modernity are, however, closely connected and, as will be our argument, also linked to the specific political situation of the time and what we call the “multiple interwar modernities”, which resulted from the political turmoil WWI had created and the subsequent manifestations of ideological alternatives, i.e. fascism in Italy, and, most importantly, bolshevism in the former Russian Empire. Consequently, the Rif war was of major importance for both the French communists and the anti-imperialists from the colonies living in France, because it showed the – at least for a time – successful realization of an alternative, anticolonial world order, which was, in their view, part of the broader anti-capitalist and anti-imperialist vision realized in the Soviet Union. The interwar period was thus a time in which the French national and imperial identity underwent fundamental change: the first signs of anti-colonial resistance were interpreted in the metropole in a highly polarized debate shaped by global discourses about self-determination and anti-colonial resistance and made the French adapt the “mission civilisatrice” and its underlying racism to the metropole, either in the surveillance of colonial immigrants or Josephine Baker’s Revue nègre. The colonial Other was thereby made an essential and inseparable part of French identity and modernity in the interwar period.

Our journey through the “colonial subconscious” begins with the supposedly most profane part: colonial food. While exotic food from the colonies had already been available before 1914, the wartime necessities, caused by the loss of the agricultural self-sufficiency, changed the Parisian culinary world. The colonial lobby used these shifts to portray the colonies “as necessary to sustaining life in the metropole.” Although some of these new foodstuffs were rejected by the population, the volume, availability and interest in older colonial products – sugar, chocolate, and coffee – increased after the war and came more and more from the French colonies in particular, due to protectionist trade policies. Moreover, foods like rice, bananas and pineapples became easily available only after the war and changed eating habits permanently, unlike whole dishes from the colonies. Besides, the loss of livestock in the war made the French import non-exotic frozen meet, a way new technology was introduced in the colonial trade. The Colonial Exhibition from 1931, finally, presented the visitors a dual impression of colonial food: exotic goods were contrasted with Algerian wine and agricultural products symbolizing the progress the French had brought to their overseas departments.[4] All these developments helped introduce the colonies in everyday life, the same way adverts with colonial imagery did, which used racist stereotypes already prominently featured in postcards and jokes about the West African troops serving in France.[5]

The 1931 exhibition, however, was the most successful and prestigious presentation of the colonies in the metropole. Both in terms of visitors and money invested, the exhibition outside Paris celebrating the anniversary of the seizure of Algiers in 1830 surpassed its precursors, despite the economic crises. It offered its eight million visitors a virtual tour through the colonies, each being represented by its own pavilion. While the 1889 Paris Exhibition, marking the centenary of the Revolution, had been a symbol of France’s republican identity, this imperial show should cement France’s imperial identity, and, as Marshall Lyautey, head of the exhibition, put it, “intensify the loyalty of the metropolitan population to the colonial empire.”[6] The leitmotiv of the show was to contrast French progress in form of modern technology with the colonial, exotic Other, as already seen in the Algerian pavilion. The best symbol of this was undoubtedly the electric illumination of the reconstruction of the “Khmer temple of Angkor Wat, the chief attraction of the fairground”. The availability to reach the exhibition with modern means of transport like the metro line built only for this purpose was part of this French imperial modernity.[7] The French visitor was thereby reminded of the insurmountable line which separated him from, but at the same time connected him to the colonial world, which could only with the help of the French become modern, albeit only to a certain degree. This show, however, constitutes only the peak of a constant propaganda effort of the government and the colonial lobby to promote the colonies to the French. Apart from the memorialization of colonial conquest in street names or metro stations, which had already been a prewar propaganda tool, the colonies became a subject of the secondary school curriculum in 1925.[8] Moreover, the colonial lobby tried to propagate the importance of the colonies for the metropole by publishing a vast amount of books and articles about their wartime participation. What is more, the government tried to make entrepreneurs invest in the colonies and import raw materials from France’s own possessions.[9]

Another way the French came in contact with their empire were new technological advancements: radio broadcasts and movies. The former reached an ever increasing number of listeners in forms of state-controlled news broadcasts about the empire as well as through private-owned plays set in the colonies. These plays, unlike the state programs, did not present the colonies in a positive light, but rather exhibited disappointment in the colonial project and stressed both the dangers and the boredom French experienced in their empire. French culture was depicted as clearly superior to the native ones, the colonies were thus only an economic advantage and “all of the cultural and social advantages travelled in the other direction.” After all, the shows were more about French identify than about a realistic depiction of life in the colonies, which “could only show a poor reflection of the best that was France, and make the metropole and French home more glorious in comparison.”[10] For many French in the metropole, these shows, however, were the only way to experience far-away places like Indo-China or Sub-Saharan Africa and therefore crucial for the French imperial identity by presenting a clear cultural hierarchy and racial stereotypes to their listeners. “Cinéma colonial” presented a similar picture. While documentaries showed the colonies in moving pictures to the French already since 1897, the interwar period saw the rise of colonial movies, which were shot mostly in North Africa and influenced by the colonial administration as the price for their financial backing of the shootings. These movies borrowed themes and images from the earlier films as well as orientalist paintings, magazines, dioramas or postcards. Like the radio shows, they stressed racial and cultural superiority of the French colonisers and legitimised the French rule, especially the Foreign Legion. What is more, “by disseminating colonial mythology, film helped Frenchmen transcend narrow identities and redefine themselves as bearers of civilisation to the colonized”[11] and thereby also to overcome class differences, since both the French working-class and the bourgeoisie were part of this civilisation. The later discussed Rif War, finally, marked the end of the shootings in Morocco.

Although available only to a minority of the French, visiting the colonies as tourists also played an important part in consolidating the top-down relationship between colonisers and colonised in the French national and imperial identity. Also pushed by the colonial lobby and propagated at the 1931 exposition, colonial tourism was represented as a duty for French citizens, a vehicle for tourists to educate themselves about the ‘facts’ of colonialism and the ‘good news’ of France’s civilizing mission through first hand experiences.” Adverts for the organized tours, especially to North Africa and Indochina, stressed the exotic experience and the difference between France and “’timeless’ peoples and landscapes.” Also, tourism stressed again the technological superiority for instance by focusing on steamships in its posters. These ships transported over 300,000 tourists from France to Algeria and Tunisia in 1923.[12] Again, colonial governors like Lyautey promoted colonial tourism, which shows the connection between the private companies and the government officials in the creation of the imperial identity.

The last analysed aspect of “banal imperialism” is the négritude of the 1920s. Being only one part of the “remarkable affinity for the things of the colonial world”[13] of cultural modernism in interwar France, this phenomenon is inseparably linked to the success of Josephine Baker in the Revue Nègre and her subsequent career as a star of cinéma colonial. This fascination with black culture was a “particular form of cultural primitivism that developed out of earlier exoticist discourses in the French intellectual tradition.”[14] For Carole Sweeney, this phenomenon, which “emerged out of a profound social and cultural crisis around modernity and empire in metropolitan France”, is “revealing an epochal desire for an alternative temporal and geographical space in which the increasingly alienated subject of modernity sought historical and aesthetic refuge in a process of racial re-imagination.” For our analysis this means, that it is a cultural manifestation of the racial barrier which is part of the imperial modernity created in interwar France, even if presented as fascinating and modern. We can thus state so far that “French culture had indeed devoured colonial culture, making it an integral part of itself.”[15]

Another aspect of the interwar imperial identity is the relationship between the state and the colonial immigrants. In the interwar period, France had the highest level of foreigners worldwide, roughly 3 million or 7% of the population in 1931. Of these, North Africans, especially Algerians, the largest share of colonial migrants, constituted only a small percentage, but aroused a disproportionate degree of public attention.[16] This migration as well as the attitude of the French public and administration towards it was closely connected to the French rule in Algeria. Not only was the double standard of humanity, which denied the universality of the ideals of the Revolution, developed in Algeria, but the French also created the poverty which made Algerians leave their homeland. Due to the high demand for labour in 1914 the government opened the borders for migrants from Algeria. The losses in the war together with a low fertility rate even increased this demand after the war. The vast amount of publications on the “Arab problem” following this immigration was an expression of the need the metropolitan society felt “to define itself in relation to an immediate, visible minority presence which was perceived as threatening, a barbaric intrusion into the heart of Empire.”[17] This discourse reproduced racist stereotypes already present before the war and linked them to a perceived threat of a Communist “infection” of the colonial workers. This racism mixed with anti-communist fear also shaped the surveillance of the government, which the North African migrants faced more than any other immigrant group. A coalition of leading national politicians and right-wing municipal councillors in Paris created a surveillance system which shaped the attitude of the French state towards migrants from the Maghreb for decades to come. A joint institution was established, manned by Europeans from Algeria, “who introduced into the metropole colonial attitudes and techniques of control” and combining police surveillance and some kind of “welfare” institutions including mosques, worker hostels, and a Muslim hospital at the outskirts of Paris, which most migrants refused to go to. These measures were aimed at segregating the migrants from the rest of the society and their dangerous influences like Communism. They gained support from “across the political spectrum, from the right-wing leagues to the left wing of the Socialist Party.”[18] What made the situation of the North African migrants even worse was the absence of any consular representation, which helped Italian or Polish migrant workers when they faced problems.

As already indicated at the beginning, the migrants from – not only the French – colonial world used Paris to share their visions of independence for their respective countries and developed an anti-colonial network closely linked to the Parti communiste français (PCF) and the Comintern-funded Anti-imperialist League. “The French capital functioned as a vantage point that clarified the contours of a global system.”[19] Soon after the war, the first anti-colonial newspapers were published by colonial migrants and university students, who even organized an “anti-exhibition” to the 1931 colonial show, presenting colonial oppression.[20] The cooperation between the French left and the anti-imperial movement was, however, ambivalent, as the case of the Algerian Etoile nord-africaine shows. It was founded in 1926 by the PCF, but tensions rose both with the Front populaire government over its colonial policy and the Communists. After it was dissolved in 1937, its leadership moved to Algiers, turned to radical nationalism and cut its connections to the French left.[21]

The Rif War, finally, shows the cleavages in the French society and entailed a highly charged discourse over one of the first threats to the French imperial rule, which, as we have seen, had become a crucial part of French culture. The war was only one of four uprisings at the time, the others being rebellions in Syria, Vietnam and the Congo, which were, however, too far away from France to attract as much attention.[22] The Rif war was the “by-product of a much longer struggle between Rif Berber tribes and the Spanish”[23], which had divided Northern Morocco between themselves and the French in 1912. Under their leader Abd el-Krim, however, several Berber tribes resisted the Spanish conquest and formed the Rif Republic, an independent Islamic State. In 1924, Rif troops started an offensive on French Morocco as well to further their influence and liberate the whole of Morocco. Being challenged by this attack, which even threatened the French position in Algeria, the French coordinated their effort to drive el-Krim’s forces back with the Spanish, and ultimately the two armies managed to crush the resistance and consolidated their rule in Morocco in 1926. This colonial war, fought with modern weaponry and even poison gas on the Spanish side caused heavy left-wing resistance in France, which was, however, only the most extreme form of the general criticism of the colonial project articulated in varying intensity.[24] The protests, which culminated in a general strike in October 1925, were led by the PCF, which had very close links to the Comintern in Moscow, although the latter constantly reminded the former to pay more attention to the anticolonial struggle. The campaign started in late 1924 following the Spanish defeat with a fraternisation letter of the party leadership with el-Krim in l’Humanité, the party newspaper, and the demand for independence of the Rif Republic. While the majority of the governing socialists in the Cartel des gauches – which was divided over the issue – did not join the anti-imperialist campaign, other radical left-wing groups like Clarté, a pacifist group emerging from the bloodshed of WWI as an “International of the Mind” and a group of left-wing and surrealist intellectuals joined in a press war with the socialists and conservatives, which we will now have a closer look at.[25]

In July 1925, at the height of the war, Henri Barbusse, leader of Clarté, published a letter in l’Humanité, headed “Les travailleurs intellectuels aux côtés du prolétariat contre la guerre du Maroc”, in which he and the other signatories, forced by the events in Morocco, protest against “cette nouvelle grande guerre qui se déploie et s’allonge sept ans après le massacre du dix-sept cent mille Français et de dix millions d’hommes dans le monde“ and demand independence for the Rif as part of the right for self-determination of every people. They see its origin in imperialism and the secret treaty between France and Spain. Yet, they argue in favour of French honour, which is, other than the government claims, not violated by anti-war protest, but by the new bloodshed, which shall be ended by the League of Nations.[26] The reaction to this letter we find five days later in Le Figaro, in an open letter entitled “Les Intellectuels aux côtés de la Patrie”, signed by, inter alia, members of the Académie française. They claim that the majority of intellectuals was on the side of “la patrie” and accuse the writers of the former letter of hypocrisy, because they didn’t protest against the violence against intellectuals in Soviet Russia. The French are depicted as bringing peace, progress and humanity to North Africa, which has ended an eternal, inter-tribal war. In the same issue, an article entitled “Les réalités du Maroc” depicts the Rif rebellion as threatening the entire empire and consequently France’s position as a great power. The author finds the reason of the rebellion in “certaines imprudences de notre politique islamisante” as well as in the disorder WWI has left behind in Europe, a reference to the Communist Opposition.[27] This anticommunism was, as we have already seen in the case of the colonial immigrants, deeply rooted in the political elite and the driving force behind efforts for colonial modernisation, which should, according to Colonial Minister Albert Sarraut, serve as an anti-communist security measure.[28]

Call for fraternisation of French and Rif soldiers in L'Humanité, 07.07.1925, p.1. The text reads: “La Fraternisation dans la mort”. Subtitle: “Le capitalisme vous fait frateriser DANS LA MORT ; soldats français et riffains, fraternisez DANS LA VIE!”
Call for fraternisation of French and Rif soldiers in L’Humanité, 07.07.1925, p.1. The text reads: “La Fraternisation dans la mort”. Subtitle: “Le capitalisme vous fait frateriser DANS LA MORT ; soldats français et riffains, fraternisez DANS LA VIE!”

On the same day, l’Humanité published a call for fraternisation of French and Rif soldiers. The whole country is described as rising against the imperialists, who have brought war in the country they pretend to cultivate. Interestingly, they too draw a line between Communism and anti-imperialism by citing the resistance of French soldiers to intervene in the Russian civil war as an example for successful fraternisation.[29] The socialist newspaper Le Populaire presents a forth position. Like Barbusse, they call for the League of Nations to solve the situation, but at the same time they consider the war necessary, although “le Parti socialiste n’assume aucune responsabilité du passé pour l’occupation militaire du Maroc.” Therefore, they condemn the propagated fraternisation, which would make the soldiers victims both of French militarism and “de la politique étrangère de bolchevisme.” The evacuation of Morocco would only worsen the situation and has therefore to be opposed.[30] Yet, even the Communist resistance and attitude towards the colonial question was ambivalent, as we have seen already in the case of the Algerian nationalists. In the course of the 1930s, the party, whose base “had never been entirely committed to the rights of colonial people”, refrained from its anti-racist stance and “amounted to a tacit defence of the empire.”[31]

The Maghreb, this essay has shown, “marked France’s passage through the twentieth century.”[32] It formed a decisive part of the French inseparably linked national and imperial modernity by creating a constant duality and hierarchy of culture and humanity. The colonial Other was thereby imprinted on French culture and politics, visible in the Négritude or the racist surveillance practices. The discourse around the Rif war, the first real threat to the imperial world order, was closely linked to the rather inner-European contestation of varying vision of modernity. If we look further into the history of Western Europe in the 20th century, we find that the Rif war was of great importance for the dark side of modernity in both France and Spain, the two countries fighting the Rif Republic hand in hand: it is the same figures that lead or partake in the suppression of the first at least for some years successful African struggle for independence that will later lead the fight against the French and Spanish republics, Francisco Franco and, after Lyautey’s removal in 1925, Philippe Pétain. Part of this dark side of modernity was also the “colonial holy alliance”, which was apparent at the participation of fascist Italy at the 1931 colonial exhibition. At the same time, el-Krim’s guerrilla tactics inspired Che Guervara to create his version of an anti-imperial modernity[33], which had been imagined in interwar Paris, the place where Algerian, Chinese and Vietnamese anti-imperial fighters met who should change history so dramatically in the era of decolonization. The city thus remained the “capital of modernity” in the first half of the 20th century.

Primary Sources

Barbusse, Henri: “Les travailleurs intellectuels aux côtés du prolétariat contre la guerre du Maroc”, in L’Humanité, 02.07.1925, p. 1.

“Devant La Tuerie. Fraternisation!”, in L’Humanité, 07.07.1925, p. 1.

“Les Intellectuels aux côtés de la Patrie”, in Le Figaro, 07.07.1925, p. 1.

“Paix immédiate! Evacuation! Tout le Maroc se soulève contre l’envahisseur”, in Le Figaro, 07.07.1925, p. 1.

“Pour la paix au Maroc. Une Conférence socialiste internationale”, in Le Populaire, 01.08.1925, p.2.

“Résolution sur le Maroc. Votée à l‘unanimité”, in Le Populaire, 31.07.1925, p. 1.

Romier, Lucien: “The realities of Morocco”, in Le Figaro, 07.07.1925, p. 1.

Secondary Sources

Aissaoui, Rabah: Algerian nationalists in the French political arena and beyond: the Etoile nord africaine and the Parti du peuple algérien in interwar France, The Journal of North African Studies, 15 (2010), pp. 1-12.

August, Thomas G.: The Selling of the Empire. British and French Imperialist Propaganda, 1890-1940 (Westport: Greenwood Press, 1985).

Billig, Michael: Banal Nationalism (London: Sage Publications, 1995).

Daughton, J.P.: Behind the Imperial Curtain. International Humanitarian Efforts and the Critique of French Colonialism in the Interwar Years, French Historical Studies, 34 (2011), pp. 503-528.

Drake, David: The PCF, the Surrealists, Clarté and the Rif War, French Cultural Studies, 17 (2006), pp. 173-188.

Er, Mevliyar: Abd-el-Krim al-Khattabi: The Unknown Mentor of Che Guevara, Terrorism and Political Violence, 0 (2015), pp. 1-23.

Ezra, Elizabeth: The Colonial Unconscious. Race and Culture in Interwar France (Ithaca: Cornell University Press, 2000).

Furlough, Ellen: Une leçon des choses: Tourism, Empire, and the Nation in Interwar France, French Historical Studies, 25 (2002), pp. 441-473.

Goebel, Michael: Anti-Imperial Metropolis. Interwar Paris and the Seeds of Third World Nationalism (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2015).

Harvey, David: Paris, Capital of Modernity (New York: Routledge, 2006).

Janes, Lauren Rebecca Hinkle: The Taste of Empire: Colonial Food in Interwar Paris (Pro Quest Dissertations Publishing, 2011).

Lebovics, Herman: True France. The Wars over Cultural Identity, 1900-1945 (Ithaca: Cornell University Press, 1994).

MacMaster, Neil: Colonial Migrants and Racism. Algerians in France, 1900-62 (New York: St. Martin’s Press, 1997).

Neulander, Joelle: Airing the exotic: Colonial landscapes on French interwar metropolitan Radio, Historical Journal of Film, Radio and Television, 27 (2007), pp. 313-332.

Rosenberg, Clifford: The Colonial Politics of Health Care Provision in Interwar Paris, French Historical Studies, 27 (2004), pp. 637-668.

Slavin, David Henry: Colonial Cinema and Imperial France, 1919-1939. White Blind Spots, Male Fantasies, Settler Myths (Baltimore: John Hopkins University Press, 2001).

Sweeney, Carole: La Revue Nègre: négrophilie, modernity and colonialism in inter-war France, Journal of Romance Studies, 1 (2001), pp. 1-13.

Thomas, Martin: Albert Sarraut, French Colonial Development, and the Communist Threat, 1919-1930, The Journal of Modern History, 77 (2005), pp. 917-955.

Thomas, Martin: The French empire between the wars. Imperialism, politics and society (Manchester: Manchester University Press, 2005).

[1] Harvey, David: Paris, Capital of Modernity (New York: Routledge, 2006).

[2] Goebel, Michael: Anti-Imperial Metropolis. Interwar Paris and the Seeds of Third World Nationalism (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2015).

[3] Billig, Michael: Banal Nationalism (London: Sage Publications, 1995).

[4] Janes, Lauren Rebecca Hinkle: The Taste of Empire: Colonial Food in Interwar Paris (Pro Quest Dissertations Publishing, 2011), pp. 1-20, 333.

[5] Thomas, Martin: The French empire between the wars. Imperialism, politics and society (Manchester: Manchester University Press, 2005), pp. 190-191.

[6] Lebovics, Herman: True France. The Wars over Cultural Identity, 1900-1945 (Ithaca: Cornell University Press, 1994), p. 53.

[7] Ibid., pp. 57-59.

[8] Thomas: Empire, pp. 188-189.

[9] August, Thomas G.: The Selling of the Empire. British and French Imperialist Propaganda, 1890-1940 (Westport: Greenwood Press, 1985), pp. 54-64.

[10] Neulander, Joelle: Airing the exotic: Colonial landscapes on French interwar metropolitan Radio, Historical Journal of Film, Radio and Television, 27 (2007), pp. 313-332.

[11] Slavin, David Henry: Colonial Cinema and Imperial France, 1919-1939. White Blind Spots, Male Fantasies, Settler Myths (Baltimore: John Hopkins University Press, 2001), pp. xi-4.

[12] Furlough, Ellen: Une leçon des choses: Tourism, Empire, and the Nation in Interwar France, French Historical Studies, 25 (2002), pp. 441-473.

[13] Lebovics: France, p. 94.

[14] Sweeney, Carole: La Revue Nègre: négrophilie, modernity and colonialism in inter-war France, Journal of Romance Studies, 1 (2001), pp. 1-13.

[15] Ezra, Elizabeth: The Colonial Unconscious. Race and Culture in Interwar France (Ithaca: Cornell University Press, 2000), p. 3.

[16] MacMaster, Neil: Colonial Migrants and Racism. Algerians in France, 1900-62 (New York: St. Martin’s Press, 1997), p. 4.

[17] Ibid.

[18] Rosenberg, Clifford: The Colonial Politics of Health Care Provision in Interwar Paris, French Historical Studies, 27 (2004), pp. 637-668.

[19] Goebel: Metropolis, p. 3.

[20] Thomas: Empire, pp. 186-201.

[21] Aissaoui, Rabah: Algerian nationalists in the French political arena and beyond: the Etoile nord africaine and the Parti du peuple algérien in interwar France, The Journal of North African Studies, 15 (2010), pp. 1-12.

[22] Thomas: Empire, p. 211.

[23] Ibid., p. 212.

[24] Daughton, J.P.: Behind the Imperial Curtain. International Humanitarian Efforts and the Critique of French Colonialism in the Interwar Years, French Historical Studies, 34 (2011), pp. 503-528.

[25] Drake, David: The PCF, the Surrealists, Clarté and the Rif War, French Cultural Studies, 17 (2006), pp. 173-188.

[26] L’Humanité, 02.07.1925, p. 1.

[27] Le Figaro, 07.07.1925, p. 1.

[28] Thomas, Martin: Albert Sarraut, French Colonial Development, and the Communist Threat, 1919-1930, The Journal of Modern History, 77 (2005), pp. 917-955.

[29] L’Humanité, 07.07.1925, p. 1.

[30] Le Populaire, 01.08.1925, p.2 and 31.08.1925, p. 1.

[31] Slavin: Cinema, pp. 4, 73-74.

[32] Ibid.

[33] Er, Mevliyar: Abd-el-Krim al-Khattabi: The Unknown Mentor of Che Guevara, Terrorism and Political Violence, 0 (2015), pp. 1-23.

Vichy and Budapest under the swastika – a comparison

Contrary to a reading of the German occupation of Europe and the history of the Shoa as one linear process, one can explain the mechanism of extermination as full of contradictions and pragmatic decisions held together by the leitmotiv of the national socialist ideology. The initial German preference for moderate forces in Croatia after the invasion of Yugoslavia instead of the Ustaše as well as the support for Antonescu in Romania instead of the Iron Guard are examples of this policy. Likewise, the history of the Shoa in France and Hungary is one of immense contradictions. Both countries became part of the German sphere of influence, but under somewhat different conditions: While France was divided into two zones after the German invasion with a neutral and sovereign state in the unoccupied south, Hungary became officially part of the Tripartite Pact in November 1940, gained territories of its neighbours from 1938 to 1941 thanks to its proximity to Berlin and joined the German attacks on Yugoslavia and the Soviet Union. In terms of both states’ policy towards the “Jewish question”, the two countries dealt in a very different way with the German demand for the deportation of the Jewish population. While the Hungarian government refused to hand over the Hungarian Jews, despite its antisemitic laws and an intense “homegrown” antisemitism, the French government accepted the German demands and deported non-French Jews from the southern, unoccupied zone to the North, from where they were sent to Auschwitz, despite the long French tradition of Jewish emancipation and liberal democracy.

In the following, these seeming contradictions shall be analysed based on the question of the background of the decisions made by the two governments. Therefore, this essay focuses on the time before the occupation of the French southern zone in November 1942 and Hungary in 1944, respectively. Since the decisions of the two unoccupied governments shall be compared, the focus will thus be on the deportations from the French south rather than on the roundups in northern France, although they were organised by the French police as well. In the first part of the essay, the long-term ideological backgrounds, especially the nature of antisemitism in both countries before and after the First World War, will be examined. Based on this background, in the second part specific documents will be analysed in order to determine the scope of action of the two governments. The primary sources are documents from the German Foreign Office and the German occupation authorities in France. Robert Paxton has shown in his sensational book “La France de Vichy”[1] that the use of German documents can be a sufficient and even revealing source-base for an analysis of the history of the participation of an allied government in the extermination of the Jewish population. Still, we have to take into account that the solely German perspective has its limits; since the analysis is about the negotiations, though, they tell us enough about the decisions the two governments took.

The comparison between France and Hungary reveals the importance of the connection between the different long-term history of Antisemitism and Jewish Emancipation and the antisemitic policies in the Second World War in each state. Also, a comparison between the two countries shows the possibilities the German allies had under its predominance and the alternative decisions they took.

To begin with, the two countries developed a different definition of Jewish citizenship in the 19th century. In France, enlightened circles were pressing for the Jewish emancipation already by the 1780s.[2] The French revolution then made France the first European country to grant Jews “full political, legal, and social equality, eliminating all former barriers to their participation in every aspect of life”[3] in 1790 and 1791. Emancipation, from Enlightenment perspective, should strip Jews of their Jewish identity and make them socially and culturally indistinguishable from other – Christian – citizens. During the 19th century the French state held to the “civic definition of membership of the French nation state”[4]. This situation made Jewish life flourish and the new Jewish citizens believe in and feel part of the republic.

In Hungary, by contrast, the emancipation of Jews was not the result of a revolutionary idea, but closely linked to the political situation of the Habsburg Dual Monarchy. Since ethnic Magyars made up only about half of the population of Transleithania, the Magyar leadership welcomed the largely voluntary Magyarization of Jews. In their eyes, Jewish emancipation served the national cause, “both as enthusiastic new members of the Magyar nation and as the group with the most capability for modernizing the Hungarian economy”[5]. Hence the two definitions differed from the beginning on: While France regarded Jews who committed to the republic as full members of the democratic, political unity (in absence of a national question), emancipation in Hungary became a weapon in the conflict between the Magyar leadership and the ethnic minorities in the Hungarian half of the dual monarchy and a means of modernizing the economy. This rather pragmatic approach to the “Jewish question” in Hungary we will find again later in the interwar-period and the Second World War.

The history of antisemitism in both countries took a quite different course. In France, the Dreyfus-Affair is certainly the most important incident in this respect. It occurred in a time when, beginning in the 1880s, antisemitism grew due to the catastrophic military defeat against the Prussian army, a fundamental constitutional change and a Europe-wide economic depression. The arrest and accusation of treason and espionage for the German enemy of the Alsatian Jew Alfred Dreyfus became the perfect occasion for all opponents of the Third Republic and the liberal state in general to express their criticism. In their minds, all Jews were in the enemy camp because of their mentioned gratitude to the Republic. Yet, his final triumph in 1906 discredited antisemitism in France for the next two decades.[6] In a broader perspective, however, Dreyfus and with him all French Jews became a symbol of a rational, Enlightenment and republican modernity.[7] This association then became important again in the 1930s, when a new wave of antisemitism, caused to a big extent by the world economic crisis, was linked to anticommunism. In this mood, a strong chauvinistic attitude emerged, which was directed not only against Jews. Still, orthodox Jewish immigrants from Eastern Europe who often only spoke Yiddish were the most visible among the 2,45 million foreigners in France in 1935.[8] The Jewish and socialist head of the Popular Front government, Leon Blum, finally became the symbol of the failure of the republican, capitalist system for all opponents of the liberal state. The phoney war then entailed an increase in antisemitic expressions. “For many, the foreigners and the Jews in general, had dragged France into a hopeless and unnecessary war for personal reasons.”[9]

In Hungary, the First World War was a true watershed in the history of antisemitism. Although one of the first antisemitic movements occurred in Hungary in the 19th century, before 1914 the government considered antisemitism “an attack on one of the central pillars of the Magyar national cause”[10] and thus challenged it. The situation worsened dramatically after the war and Béla Kun’s short-lived Hungarian Soviet Republic, in which Jews had played an important role and which was associated with Jewish Marxism by its opponents after its suppression by the Romanian army and Horthy’s counter-revolutionary forces. What is more, in post-Trianon Hungary the Jews were no longer needed to achieve a Magyar majority since Budapest did not rule the former national minorities of the Habsburg monarchy any more. Instead, the “community of interest” was now based most of all on economic terms.[11] The association of the Jewish population with the “national enemy”, Bolshevism, explains the first antisemitic law enacted in the 20th century, an anti-Jewish Numerus Clausus. Yet, the next antisemitic laws started only in 1938, when the proportion of Jewish employees in certain professions was reduces to 20 per cent.[12] A second law in 1939 went even further and provided for the removal of Jews from the public service by means of an exacerbated quotation of twelve or six percent for certain professions and an even stricter Numerus Clausus of six percent. A third law prohibited marriage between Jews and non-Jews in 1941.[13] In the justification of this law the government stated for the first time the aim of “racial purity of the Hungarian Nation” and expressed the will to segregate Jews from the rest of society. In addition, it contained an extension of the definition of the term “Jew”.[14] This third law was, as the second one to an extent, without doubt based on German pressure.[15]

These laws and the general emergence of antisemitism was one part of a political radicalisation and the rise of fascism in the 1930s following the economic crisis and the fall of agrarian prices, which hit the still predominantly rural society of Hungary particularly hard.[16] Different national socialist parties like the Arrow Cross movement used this situation to explain Hungary’s problems with their antisemitic propaganda and received together about 25 percent in the 1939 election.[17] The antisemitic laws were often justified by politicians as countering this wide-spread antisemitism. What is more, the radicalisation expressed in the three antisemitic laws was part of the rapprochement with Nazi-Germany, which was seen as the power able and willing to re-draw the borders of central Europe in favour of Hungary.[18]

This brings us to the second part of our analysis, the two different relations to Germany culminating in the two varying reactions to the German exterminatory policy. In both cases it is important to state that the antisemitism which made the exclusion of the Jewish population possible was not imported from Germany, but had its own roots. Also, however, in both cases the governments did not share the German exterminatory antisemitism[19], their final aim was not the complete and systematic extermination of all European Jews, although both governments played their part in this process. Still, the situation of Vichy differed in many respects. The disastrous defeat against the Germans explains the need for a scapegoat, which was found in the “decadence” of the Third Republic and the Jews who were, as shown above, associated with the liberal, Enlightened, republican modernity by its opponents who came to power in 1940. Besides, the French government in Vichy dealt with a different military situation than rather autonomous Hungary: although the south was not occupied by the Germans, the threat to do so remained. In addition, the French POWs in Germany were a means of pressure and a remainder of the German supremacy. Yet, the first antisemitic laws were passed without any direct German pressure.[20] Some of them were not directed at Jews only, but at foreigners in general, like a “law limiting employment in the public sector to individuals born of French fathers”[21]. Vichy also annulled two pre-war laws with serious consequences for Jews living in France: a liberal naturalisation law of 1927 and a decree from 1939 which had prohibited attacks in the press “based on race or religion”[22]. In October 1940 a “Statut des Juifs” followed these measures which defined the term “Jew” and excluded Jews from public service, the army and other important professions like journalism. “The timing suggests that the statute had been in preparation well before the publication of the German decrees. The surprising priority awarded to the ‘Jewish question’ cannot be explained as a result of direct German pressure.”[23] In the following, Vichy issued “26 laws and 24 decrees on the Jews”.[24] Most importantly, in July 1941 a census was ordered in the southern zone. “This was a breach with the Republican tradition confining questions of religion and ethnic origin to the private sphere; it had grave consequences when Jews started to be rounded up in 1942.”[25] These laws, in a broader perspective, are a perfect example of the initially mentioned contradictions of the Vichy policy: their definition of the term “Jew” was even more radical than the German one, but, “unlike the Germans, [they] allowed some people to escape the full consequences of its anti-Semitic policy”.[26] Another example is the yellow badge, which was not introduced in the south despite the German demand to do so.

Without these laws, the deportation of foreign, non-French Jews from the southern zone would not have been possible. The negotiations preceding the handing over of 41,951 Jews in 1942 started already in 1941. A report of a meeting between the German military commander of France, Otto von Stülpnagel, and the new “Commissioner-General for Jewish Questions” of Vichy, Xavier Vallat, on 5 April 1941 shows the still sceptical attitude of the French government towards a deportation, since, as Vallat stated, “there were few countries left which were willing to receive Jews.” He advocates the French autonomy by presenting the intensified anti-Jewish guidelines Pétain instructed him to elaborate. What is more, one can see the distinctions Vichy made between different groups of Jews: Vallat tried to justify the exception of some 6000-7000 bereaved of world war combatants from the anti-Jewish measures. Since the French people would interpret such an act as German pressure against war veterans, it would be better to leave them alone and advance on the other Jews “all the more radical”.[27] The willingness of the French government to deport Jews from the south then seems to have changed in less than a year. A document from February 1942 cites a German consul general, Krug von Nidda, who believed that the French would even provide Jews from the south if there were clear proposals. Von Nidda also is quoted as believing the French government would be happy to get rid of the “the Jews” in any way after many talks with French politicians, among them François Darlan.[28] This shows that there were talks about this issue between German and French authorities, but on the same time it proves that inside the French leadership intentions had changed.

A document from September 1942 referring back to talks in May even shows that René Bousquet, secretary general of the Vichy police, asked Heydrich in a meeting about the deportation of Jews form the northern zone if also stateless Jews from the south could be deported, which was refused because of transportation difficulties.[29] In July 1942, finally, two documents show the distinction Vichy made between “foreign” and “French” Jews. In the first one, Bousquet tells several SS-officers the preference of his government to deport the foreign Jews “at first”. As the Germans accepted this, he agreed to arrest a number of foreign Jews in the whole of France which was determined by the Germans.[30] In a second one, Laval is quoted as having accepted this deal. In addition, he proposed to deport the children under 16 years together with their parents. “The question of Jewish children (“Judenkindern”) remaining in the occupied part does not interest him.”[31] This shows that the distinction must not be overrated: many of these children had become French citizens at birth and are thus, by definition, not foreign.[32]

These documents show that the French government acted without direct German pressure and even in part on their own initiative. At this point, the French definition of citizenship may help us understand these – contradictory – decisions: The antisemite Vichy-leadership still stuck to the old idea that Jews could be part of the nation by assimilation, rather than stripping all Jews of the French citizenship, although it changed it to a system of different grades of citizenship in which Jews were strongly discriminated against and could not be part of the state apparatus. Foreign Jews Vichy did not care about and handed them over to the Germans, although it has to be remarked that Vichy, although aware of the horrible conditions these people were sent to, probably did not know that their extermination was the final aim of the Germans, at least not when the deportations started.[33] The case of the French children, however, shows the limits of this explanation.

In the Hungarian case, the negotiations had a different frame. Since the country was a German ally, there were no occupation authorities. Besides, unlike in the case of Slovakia, Bulgaria and Rumania, the independent governments in Budapest refused to accept a German “Judenberater” in their country. Therefore, the negotiations about the deportation of the Hungarian Jews took place via the diplomatic channels. The following documents show the attempt of the Hungarian government to avoid the deportation of their Jewish population to the Germans. In the record of a talk between the Hungarian legate, Döme Sztójay, and Martin Luther, a central figure of the Jewish policy of the German Foreign Office, on 6 October 1942, the latter suggested further measures against the Hungarian Jews in and outside Hungary, most importantly the introduction of the yellow badge, as well as deportations. Sztójay’s reaction was rather sceptical. He wanted to know if the measures against Jews living in Germany and the occupied territories applied for Italian Jews as well. Since Luther assured him this would be the case he agreed. In the case of deportations, however, Sztójay stated that it would be very difficult to deport all Jews because of their large number. Also he asked Luther if the Jews would have “further existence” after the “evacuation to the East”, since his prime minister was very interested in this question and there would be rumours that unsettled him. Luther’s answer that the Jews would live in a “Jewish preserve” seem to have calmed him.[34] Although Sztójay gave in to the German pressure in the case of Hungarian Jews living abroad at this meeting, both this issue and the deportations remained points of conflict. In fact, Sztójay protested in dozens of note verbales against the deportation of Hungarian Jews living abroad to the extermination camps.[35]

The record of a talk between the prime minister, Miklós Kállay, and the German legate in Budapest a few days later reveals the insistence to deal with the “Jewish question” independently, since it would be a domestic issue. He referred to an antisemitic speech he held recently and again to the vast number of the Jews as an obstacle to remove them.[36] The sovereignty of Hungary in this issue we can find in another document as well, a letter from the Hungarian legation in Berlin, where, interestingly, economic reasons were stated which made a removal of the Jews from Hungary impossible. The legation even claimed the removal of all Jews from the economy would be against German interests since 80 percent of the Hungarian economy was working for the German war effort. Also, the yellow badge could not be introduced because it would jeopardize the social and lawful order.[37] The last analysed document from December 1942 shows the delaying game Budapest played. Kállay telled von Jagow again he would soon have an answer for him, but the situation would be more difficult in Hungary than in other countries. The government even had to show consideration for the parliament where rumours about the “treatment of the Jews in the East” were discussed.[38] Indeed, Hungary had a functioning parliament until the German occupation in 1944, in which even social democrats participated. Maybe this played a part in the decision-making. In France, by contrast, there could be no open discussion about the deportations, which were decided by the dictatorship.

The obvious contradiction between the antisemitic laws passed between 1938 and 1941 and this policy towards the Germans may be explained by both the long-term, rather pragmatic and economic relationship between the Hungarian state and its Jewish inhabitants shown above and the military situation of the war which increasingly seemed to develop in the disadvantage of Germany. After the fall of fascism in Italy and the defeat of the Hungarian army at the Don in 1943, Kállay’s government made serious considerations of how to leave the axis powers and the war.[39] In this situation, it was considered better to stop all further antisemitic measures to have a better stand in negotiations with the Western Allies.

To conclude, one thing seems clear: the cultural or civilizational split of Western and Eastern Europe fails in the explanation of the different reactions of Budapest and Vichy to the German demands. To give an exact answer in this history of contradictions seems quite difficult. The Vichy government built its legitimacy among others on the exclusion of the Jewish population from the public life, but it did not strip all of them of their citizenship, i.e. it did not completely change the relationship between the state and the Jews, but it made them to second class citizens and, for the first since the revolution and emancipation, defined and counted them based on their “difference” from Christian French. In the talks with the Germans it offered the Jews it did not care for at all and which did not even match this definition since they were foreign. In Hungary, by contrast, the old basic (economic) relationship between State and Jews also remained intact, but – as in France – Jews became more and more second class citizens. The Hungarian government(s) did not radicalise itself enough (maybe because it was no full scale dictatorship) to made the final step towards deportation. It’s higher degree of independence from Germany made it possible to hold out the radical German antisemites and its Hungarian national socialist allies until 1944.

Bibliography

Primary sources

  • Klarsfeld, Serge: Vichy – Auschwitz. Die “Endlösung der Judenfrage in Frankreich (Darmstadt: WBG, 2007).
    • XXIV-15: The German military commander in France; Administration office, Paris 05.04.1941.
    • LXXI-84: Zeitsche: Notes for legate Schleier, Paris 28.02.1942.
    • XXVI-40: File note, Paris 04.07.1942.
    • XLIX-35: Letter to the RSHA, Paris 06.07.1942.
  • „Akten zur deutschen auswärtigen Politik“. Serie E, Bd. III: 01.10.-31-12.1942.
    • 12, Berlin 06.10.1942.
    • 100, Berlin 27.10.1942.
    • 245, Berlin 02.12.1942.
    • 283, Paris 11.09.1942.

Secondary sources

Beller, Steven: Antisemitism. A Very Short Introduction, Second Edition (Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2015).

Carsten, F. L.: The Rise of Fascism, Second Edition (Berkeley: University of California Press, 1980).

Gerlach, Christian; Götz, Aly: Das letzte Kapitel. Realpolitik, Ideologie und der Mord an den ungarischen Juden 1944/1945 (Stuttgart: DVA, 2002).

Hanebrink, Paul A.: In defense of Christian Hungary. Religion, Nationalism, and Antisemitism, 1890-1944 (Ithaca, N.Y.: Cornell University Press, 2006).

Jackson, Julian: France: The Dark Years, 1940-1944 (Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2001).

Katzburg, Nathaniel: Hungary and the Jews. Policy and Legislaiton 1920-1943 (Ramat-Gan: Bar-Ilan University Press, 1981).

Marrus, Michael R. and Paxton, Robert O.: Vichy France and The Jews (Stanford, California: Stanford University Press, 1995).

Paxton, Robert O.: La France de Vichy, Paris 1973; originally published as Vichy France: Old Guard and New Order (New York: Columbia University Press, 1972).

Ránki, György: Unternehmen Margarethe. Die deutsche Besetzung Ungarns (Budapest: Corvina Kiadó, 1978).

Temkin, Moshik: ‘Avec un certain malaise’: The Paxtonian Trauma in France, 1973-74, Journal of Contemporary History, 38(2) (2003), pp. 291-306.

Susan Zuccotti: The Holocaust, the French, and the Jews (New York: BasicBooks, 1993).

Vinen, Richard: The Unfree French. Life under the Occupation (London: Allen Lane, 2006).

[1] Paxton, Robert O.: La France de Vichy, Paris 1973; originally published as Vichy France: Old Guard and New Order (New York: Columbia University Press, 1972).

[2] Beller, Steven: Antisemitism. A Very Short Introduction, Second Edition (Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2015), p. 25.

[3] Susan Zuccotti: The Holocaust, the French, and the Jews (New York: BasicBooks, 1993), p. 7.

[4] Beller: Antisemitism, p. 26.

[5] Ibid., p. 20.

[6] Zuccotti: The Holocaust, pp. 12-16.

[7] Beller: Antisemitism, pp. 23-24.

[8] Zuccotti: The Holocaust, pp. 24-25.

[9] Ibid., p. 41.

[10] Beller: Antisemitism, p. 20.

[11] Katzburg, Nathaniel: Hungary and the Jews. Policy and Legislaiton 1920-1943 (Ramat-Gan: Bar-Ilan University Press, 1981), p. 214.

[12] Gerlach, Christian; Götz, Aly: Das letzte Kapitel. Realpolitik, Ideologie und der Mord an den ungarischen Juden 1944/1945 (Stuttgart: DVA, 2002), p. 38.

[13] Ibid., pp. 46-48.

[14] Ibid., pp. 48-49.

[15] Katzburg: Hungary and the Jews, p. 218.

[16] Carsten, F. L.: The Rise of Fascism, Second Edition (Berkeley: University of California Press, 1980), p. 173.

[17] Hanebrink, Paul A.: In defense of Christian Hungary. Religion, Nationalism, and Antisemitism, 1890-1944 (Ithaca, N.Y.: Cornell University Press, 2006), pp. 164-65.

[18] Ibid., p. 166.

[19] Marrus, Michael R. and Paxton, Robert O.: Vichy France and The Jews (Stanford, California: Stanford University Press, 1995), p. xvii.

[20] Ibid., p. 5.

[21] Zuccotti: The Holocaust, p. 53.

[22] Ibid., p. 53.

[23] Ibid., p. 56.

[24] Jackson, Julian: France: The Dark Years, 1940-1944 (Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2001), p. 356.

[25] Ibid., pp. 356-57.

[26] Vinen, Richard: The Unfree French. Life under the Occupation (London: Allen Lane, 2006), p. 141.

[27] Doc. XXIV-15: The German military commander in France; Administration office, Paris 05.04.1941, in Klarsfeld, Serge: Vichy – Auschwitz. Die “Endlösung der Judenfrage in Frankreich (Darmstadt: WBG, 2007), pp. 387-389.

[28] Doc. LXXI-84: Zeitsche: Notes for legate Schleier, Paris 28.02.1942, In: Klarsfeld: Vichy, pp. 400-01.

[29] Doc. 283, Paris 11.09.1942, in „Akten zur deutschen auswärtigen Politik“, Serie E, Bd. III: 01.10.-31.12.1942.

[30] Doc. XXVI-40: File note, Paris 04.07.1942, in Klarsfeld: Vichy, pp. 422-425.

[31] Doc. XLIX-35: Letter to the RSHA, Paris 06.07.1942, In Klarsfeld: Vichy, pp. 427-28.

[32] Zuccotti: The Holocaust, p. 99.

[33] Zuccotti: The Holocaust, pp. 100-01.

[34] Doc. 12 („Notes of Unterstaatssekretär Luther“), Berlin 06.10.1942, in ADAP, E III, 01.10.-31.12.1942.

[35] Gerlach; Aly: Das letzte Kapitel, p. 81.

[36] Doc. 100 (“The legate in Budapest von Jagow to the Foreign Office”), Berlin 27.10.1942, in ADAP, E III, 01.10.-31.12.1942.

[37] Doc. 245 (“The Hungarian legation in Berlin to the Foreign Office”), Berlin 02.12.1942, in ADAP, E III, 01.10.-31.12.1942.

[38] Doc. 250 („Notes of Unterstaatssekretär Luther“), Berlin 03.12.1942, in ADAP, E III, 01.10.-31.12.1942.

[39] Ránki, György: Unternehmen Margarethe. Die deutsche Besetzung Ungarns (Budapest: Corvina Kiadó, 1978), pp. 9-11.

Fascism in interwar Central Europe

Fascism can without doubt be called one of the most difficult terms to use, since there are innumerable definitions, both those already existing during its existence and after 1945[1]. This essay, however, pursues the question of what made the various movements of the extreme right so popular in the time between 1918 and 1945, rather than discussing the different definitions. In geographical terms, the answer to this question is limited to Central Europe, a region of which also a variety of definitions exists. In general terms, the essay examines the successor states of the Habsburg Monarchy. In particular, the fascist movements of Hungary and Romania will be analysed, for two simple reasons: for one thing, only in those two countries, except for Austria, the fascist movements became mass movements, and for another, the argument of fascism being only successful in the countries defeated in the First World War and territorial ambitions resulting from this defeat is weakened.

Although not even the variety of historiographical definitions and theories on fascism can be summarized here, a working definition of fascism is necessary, both to define the object of the study and to give a theoretical background to the concrete arguments. On the one hand, Roger Griffin’s concept of fascism as a “palingenetic form of populist ultra-nationalism” shows how all fascist movements are built around the idea of a resurrection of the nation in times in which the old order seems doomed and should thus be replaced by a nation which is not based on any tradition of Enlightenment humanism or any form of “traditional” or “rational” forms of politics.[2] On the other hand, Noël O’Sullivan’s concept of fascism as an “activist style of politics” provides an important addition to the idea of re-building the nation: it is based on the cult of violence and performed in a theatrical way, which should help replace rational politics with a political myth based on emotion.[3]

In addition, antisemitism is understood as an integral part of fascism in Central Europe. According to Stephen Beller, it was part of a social and economic modernization. By rejecting both the socialist and the capitalist versions of modernity, which they both associated with “Judaism”, antisemites built their own irrational modernity. The rebirth of the nation did in Central Europe per se entail the exclusion of the Jewish fellow citizens, since they were, in the eyes of the antisemite movement, part of another “race”, whose rational modernity was rejected.[4] Yet, fascism was not only exclusive in respect to Jews, it also included all classes of society and intended to combine a worker’s cult with a capitalist nationalism (thus National Socialism). This claim of reuniting the alienated parts of society explains the support of fascism by intellectuals, workers, peasants and, most importantly, members of the petty bourgeoisie.

To begin with, the appeal of fascism cannot be explained without the First World War, which was used to generate a cult of violence and the new concept “that war itself would be the mother of radical transformation and revolution by achieving mass mobilization, the shattering of institutional barriers, and an opening for new social and cultural forces.”[5] In this concept, war was a liberating, positive force which revealed the power of the state. In addition, the war had brought broad domestic alliances, or “truces”, which were then, in the fascist reading, destroyed by the “stab-in-the-back” by communists and Jews.

The war also entailed communist uprisings in both Hungary and Romania and can generally be seen as a time of mass political culture, in which modern political and social ideologies became mass movements. In both cases, the identification of the short left-wing uprisings, especially Béla Kun’s Hungarian Soviet Republic, with “Judeo-Bolshevism” is crucial to understand the importance of anti-Communism for the appeal of fascism. As Payne puts it, fascism thrived “on its opposition to socialism and communism, to such an extent that it is appropriate to inquire whether fascism could have succeeded without the opportunity to play off that opposition.”[6] This fear of communism was in Romania even strengthened by a fear of the Soviet Union’s territorial ambitions.[7]

Apart from anti-Communism, the appeal of fascism consisted to a large extent of the unsolved land question in mostly rural Central Europe. The problem remained unsolved by the conservatives after the war and the Left was unable to solve it, since Communist parties – in consequence of the left-wing uprisings – were prohibited and the Social Democrats, although in Hungary part of the parliament until 1944, did not even try to organize the agricultural labourers due to their weak position.[8] In this situation, the extreme Right seemed the only possibility for the mass of impoverished peasants to improve their situation. In Romania, Codreanu’s Iron Guard depicted the peasantry as the essence of Romania and thus used the social situation to announce the palingenesis of the (peasant) nation.[9] In addition, the absence of a communist or powerful social-democrat alternative in the political spectrum of both countries can also explain the support of the various fascist movements by workers. A part of the appeal of fascism might thus for some simply have been the absence of an alternative.

Especially in Hungary also the success of Germany in its foreign policy from 1938 onwards contributed to the popularity of fascism, since Germany was – not only by the fascists – seen as the force which could help Hungary reverse the terms of the treaty of Trianon and regain at least parts of its pre-war territories. Interestingly, even in Romania, where fascism arose before the loss of territories due to the Second Vienna Award in 1940, the Legion as pro-German force gained strength after France’s defeat and thus the loss of Romania’s traditional protective power.

Yet, the appeal of fascism in Central Europe was not its importation from and its links to Italy and Germany, but rather that it appeared native and natural from within, which is essential for the fascist’s argument that they would rebuild the eternal nation, which of course only Hungarians or Romanians, respectively, could do.

To understand the above mentioned concept of antisemitism as a rejection of a supposedly Jewish rational modernity, we must have a closer look at the history of pre-war anti-Jewish thought in both countries and Central Europe in general. Most importantly, in the nineteenth century a shift occurred from the Enlightenment idea of Jewish emancipation by means of losing a Jewish identity and gaining a new national identity instead to a racial thinking, underpinned by biological “science”, that Jews were a separate “race” which could by no means participate in the national project. In broader terms, the definition of modernity had shifted to a more collectivist model and race had become the defining category of the idea of the nation state. In Hungary this kind of antisemitic and proto-fascist propaganda had been tackled by the elites before the war, which saw the Jews as the economic backbone of modernization and a means of gaining a Magyar majority in Transleithania. After 1919, however, Jews were seen – not only by fascists – as communist traitors and no longer needed to be labelled Magyars, and thus became the main victim of the fascist propaganda. In Romania, Codreanu could build on the discrimination against Jews of pre-war governments, which declared that most Jews in Romania were foreign and hence not citizens. This exclusion of one group of the Romanian society became even more radical after the gain of new territories in 1920, where many only Yiddish-speaking Jews were living.[10] The idea of Jews not being part of the nation emerged thus in both cases in the long nineteenth century and can be – in spite of the different reaction to Jews of pre-war governments – considered a central part of the building of a new society.

In conclusion, the appeal of fascism can be explained not only by the direct effects of the war – the short-lived communist uprisings and the economic situation –, but rather in the fascist modernity with its roots in pre-war European thought and its association of both capitalist and Marxist modernity with the “Jewish question”. In addition, long-term problems as the land question remained unsolved in the rural societies of Central Europe and an argument for the fascist revolution, which would rise phoenix-like out of the ashes of the old state. Jews could by racial definition not be part of this new and at the same time eternal Volksgemeinschaft.

Bibliography

Beller: Antisemitism. A Very Short Introduction, Second Edition (Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2015).

Carsten, F. L.: The Rise of Fascism, Second Edition (Berkeley: University of California Press, 1980).

Griffin, Roger: The Nature of Fascism (London: Routledge, 1993).

O’Sullivan, Noel: Fascism (London: Dent, 1983).

Passmore, Kevin: Fascism. A Very Short Introduction (Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2002).

Payne, Stanley G.: Civil War in Europe, 1905-1949 (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2011).

[1] For an overview see: Griffin, Roger: The Nature of Fascism (London: Routledge, 1993), pp. 1-8.

[2] Ibid.

[3] O’Sullivan, Noël: Fascism (London: Dent, 1983).

[4] Beller: Antisemitism. A Very Short Introduction, Second Edition (Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2015).

[5] Payne, Stanley G.: Civil War in Europe, 1905-1949 (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2011), p. 18.

[6] Ibid, p. 68.

[7] Passmore, Kevin: Fascism. A Very Short Introduction (Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2002), p. 85.

[8] Carsten, F. L.: The Rise of Fascism, Second Edition (Berkeley: University of California Press, 1980), p. 172.

[9] Passmore: Fascism, p. 83.

[10] Beller: Antisemitism, p. 11-87.

World War I in a global perspective

The so-called “First World War” was by far not the first war fought on several continents simultaneously: most famously, the Seven Years’ War from 1756 to 1763 affected Europe, both North and Central America, West Africa, India, and the Philippines. And, as the Crimean War shows, the “Great War”, as it is called in many Western Countries, was not even the first war in which non-European soldiers fought for European powers in a European theatre of war.[1] Still, the name is legitimate, given not only its global scale, but also the participation of non-European powers in a primarily European conflict, most importantly Japan and the USA, to a certain extent the British Dominions (given their still close constitutional relations to the UK), and, in a more supportive way, states like China, Portugal or Brazil.

In the following the global aspect of the war shall be analysed. Therefore, it shall be argued that the war served as a catalyst for phenomena of globalisation which in some ways had occurred already before 1914 and to which it added some new aspects, and that it can without doubt be considered a global war because of its global dimensions and the resulting global consequences.

After giving an overview over the international world order before 1914, in the first part of the essay the global scale of the war – most of all labor migration and the employment of non-European soldiers –  shall be examined. In a second part, the global consequences of these aspects of the war shall be analysed on the basis of primary sources from France, China and Australia, all of which relate to the Paris Peace Conference in 1919. Apart from showing the deviating conceptions of the post-war world order of the British, French and U.S. governments, on the one hand, and the Chinese government and public, on the other hand, in this second part the emergence of new local centres of power and the beginning of a more multipolar world shall be outlined, using the example of “sub-imperialist” Australia. Thus, in geographical terms the essay focuses on the British Empire, including its Dominions, especially Australia, as well as France, China and Japan.

In order to stress the consequences of the war, it is also necessary to adjust the periodization to a global understanding of the war and include the directly resulting wars in Central Europe in 1919, the war between Turkey and Greece from 1919-1922, as well as the numerous conflicts resulting from the collapse of the Tsarist Empire, which, understood as one connected bloodshed ranged from Warsaw to Vladivostok – and which was itself a truly global conflict due to the American and Japanese interventions in the Far East – to the war breaking out in July 1914. This “Long First World War” thus lasted until 1922, when Vladivostok fell to the Red Army.[2] In this understanding, the conference in Versailles was taking place while numerous conflicts which directly resulted from the war the conference was supposed to end were still being fought.

The World before 1914 was in many ways more global than one might expect, given the popular understanding of the beginning of Globalisation after 1945 or even in the 1990s. In terms of international relations, the imperial powers had created a “web of fragile and unstable regional security zones”[3], which meant that imperial rule was difficult to maintain in a global dimension, even more so after the so-called “Scramble for Africa” and the distribution of most parts of Asia among the Western imperial powers and Japan came to their end and the only remaining source for further acquisition of power became China and the Ottoman Empire, both of which were failing empires having missed a modernization of their economy and society.[4] This insecure network enabled regional conflicts to become global processes. The best example is clearly the July crisis of 1914: the regional conflict in the Balkans between Vienna and St. Petersburg immediately turned into a war of global dimensions which affected every single continent and ocean. One part of this mechanism of globalizing a local conflict was the structure of the then most powerful Empire on earth itself: the defence of London’s vast colonial rule and its trade routes relied on the acceptance of the “Pax Britannica” by the other imperial powers. The European conflict between the German and the British governments became thus automatically a global conflict since it was easier to cut the British supply lines than to attack its mainland.[5]

Within the scope of this essay there is no space to discuss the complex reasons of the outbreak of the war. What is important, though, is to recognize that the post-war order was, in many respects, an intensification of the insecure pre-war order, by offering no solution for long-term conflicts like the one between China and Japan, but rather worsening them. I thus accept Bayly’s thesis of the birth of a “multinational, more dangerous world”[6] before 1914 and aim to extend it in the following to the argument of the war being a catalyst transforming the insecure structure of imperial power to an even more fragile multipolar world without a powerful international body of world politics – which the League of Nations was clearly not.

Before discussing the global scale of the war, it is important to recognize the growing global consciousness emerging in many areas before 1914. Although one must not overestimate the role of anticolonial movements in the Western Empires before the war, the Chinese claims at the Peace Conference of 1919 can only be understood if examined in a longer perspective. In China, the revolution of 1911 can be considered a “sharp reaction to the apparently inexorable expansion of European and American economic and political influence around the world.”[7] After the proclamation of a Chinese republic in 1912 this anti-Imperial reaction was expressed in the emerging public sphere, most importantly in new founded newspapers and magazines. Confucianism was replaced by the new ideology of nationalism, the intellectual and bourgeois elite pushed for change both in China and its relations to the world. The World War then played an important part in this pre-war mind-set because it presented the opportunity to accomplish these aims in its nature of changing the international system.[8]

The war which broke out in 1914 was not only fought between the armies of the Entente and the Central Powers, but also between two competing economic blocs. The Allied nations benefited from their vast colonial resources, while the German economy was cut off from both the commodity and finance world market. In addition, the colonies supplied the “mother countries” even financially, India alone contributed £146 million to the British war costs.[9] In this respect, the United States indirectly participated in the war even before 1917 by supplying both the British and the French with credit, while Germany’s “demand for dollars” was restricted by the blockade.[10] For Japan, the economy boomed during the war, “not least on the back of Japanese investment in China […] and exploitation of China’s labour and raw materials.”[11] Another advantage of the Allied position of controlling the world oceans was the availability of labour migration from Africa, the West Indies and Indochina for the British and French armies.[12]

The most important labour market for the Allies, however, was China, which sent around 130,000 workers to France. Xu Guoqi describes the voyage of these workers to Europe and shows how harsh they were treated by their British and French employers. In short, the “voluntary” recruited workers were seen as children and forced to live in barbed-wired camps near the front-line, were they had to fulfil hard and dangerous tasks like digging the trenches. Xu also states that the experiences of these Chinese had a significant impact on the political development of China after the war, since they brought knowledge about Europe to their country of origin.[13] Although these consequences stay rather vaguely in his book, the racist and condescending attitude of the British and the French authorities towards the Chinese is revealing for the subsequent treatment of the Chinese delegation and their claims at the peace conference.

The British and French armies, however, did not only employ workers from other continents, they also deployed about 650,000 colonial soldiers on the European battlefields. In addition, Britain mobilized about 1,5 million Indian soldiers, whose majority fought in Mesopotamia against the Ottoman army. France, however, even used enlistment in some cases to support her struggle against the Germans with troops from West and North Africa, Madagascar and even Indochina.[14]

The racist attitude of the French government concerning these colonial troops is as revealing for the post-war order as the one towards the Chinese labourers. This becomes clear in a speech of Prime Minister George Clemenceau on 20 February 1918 to the French Senate:

We are going to offer civilisation to the Blacks. They will have to pay for that. […] I would prefer that ten Blacks are killed rather than one Frenchman – although I immensely respect those brave Blacks –, for I think that enough Frenchmen are killed anyway and that we should sacrifice as few as possible![15]

Apart from this large-scale global labour and military migration from other parts of the world to Europe and the resulting European reactions to this cross-continental contact – both on the Western and the Eastern side of the Western Front[16] – the war had also direct and long-term influences on the African theatre of war itself. In general, over two million Africans served in the war, most of them as packers rather than soldiers due to the insufficient infrastructure and the death of many pack animals by the tsetse fly. Over one million carriers were recruited by the British alone for their operations against the German colonial troops, which had a very different duration: While the German colonies of Togo, Cameroon and Namibia were conquered relatively quickly, the troops of General Paul von Lettow-Vorbeck in German East Africa involved the British and their Allies to a guerrilla war which lasted until 1918.[17] All in all, 10% of all Africans recruited during the war died, among the labourers maybe even 20%. Moreover, the German guerrilla war devastated large parts of East Africa.[18]

The war which had affected and killed millions of people, devastated whole regions in Europe and Africa and which had been fought on land and on sea, was tried to transform into a lasting peace at the Paris peace conference in 1919, while the fighting – as we have seen – continued in large parts of Eurasia. The opening speeches of the Western Leaders, based on the example of the French President Raymond Poincaré at this assembly of representatives from all six continents are an interesting source to analyse the Western understanding of the global dimension of the war shown above. Poincaré opens the negotiations which influenced the whole inter-war period in a degree probably no negotiator had imagined in 1919 by explaining the spread of the war to a global scale with the “pressure of the Central Powers”[19], which according to Poincaré made Portugal, China, and Siam join the war and thus depicting only the German imperialism as threatening world peace, while himself being the head of a global empire which was erected by means of violence. The entrance of the US and several Latin American countries was in his reading an act of “indignation” at the aggression which the Central Powers carried on “with fire, pillage, and massacre of inoffensive beings”, with which the world rose “from north to south”. The war is thus depicted as a moral struggle and a defence of humanity, in which the smaller nations as well as the United States helped the Allied Nations to protect civilisation. Apart from that, he presents the Allies as guarantors of freedom and independence of oppressed peoples:

While the conflict was gradually extending over the entire surface of the earth the clanking of chains was heard here and there, and captive nationalities from the depths of their age-long jails cried out to us for help.[20]

Since he does not only refer to Poles and Czecho-Slovaks, Jugoslavs and Armenians, but also to the Syrians and Lebanese, this speech can only be considered cynically, given the fact that Syria and the Lebanon became French mandatories of the League of Nations, which had already been agreed in a slightly different way in the Sykes–Picot Agreement of 1916.[21] In the light of this agreement his description of imperialism clearly shows that France and Britain were only interested in the maintenance or even expansion of their imperial power:

What justice banishes is the dream of conquest and imperialism, contempt for national will, the arbitrary exchange of provinces between states as though peoples were but articles of furniture or pawns in a game.[22]

For our argument it is important to note that the war was depicted as global in front of the future signatories of the treaty, but that in his view Britain and France– together with the United States – remained the active players or the subject of a future global order, while other nations only joined in the war against “Imperialism”.

The Chinese reaction to the peace treaty, by contrast, opens up quite a different perspective on the global dimension of the war. Even the organisational frame of the negotiations was perceived as humiliating by the Chinese government and the delegation in Paris: while China was treated as a minor power, its rival Japan was considered a major power and was part of the “Council of Ten”, existing of the main Allied nations. In the end, Japan received the former German province Shandong, which made the Chinese delegation boycott the treaty. The above mentioned new established Chinese public also closely followed the negotiations in Paris and was shocked by China’s treatment.[23] The example of the South China Morning Post illustrates this process. The paper was founded in 1903 as the first English-language newspaper in Hong-Kong. Unlike other Chinese newspapers in Hong-Kong it enjoyed a freedom of expression and thus played an important role in “consensus building”.[24] The fact that it is an English-language newspaper in a British colony does not strip it of its relevance for the Chinese discourse; on the contrary, it shows the truly global dimension of the debate about the post-war order by taking part in the discourse on a multinational level by expressing Chinese national claims in a possession of one of the opponents of these claims. In 1919, it published several articles on the negotiations, in which the feeling of injustice and the demand for sovereignty of Chinese politicians and the delegation in Paris were reported.

In April it quotes a message from the National Assembly of China to all delegations in Paris, which says that the “unequal diplomatic relations between China and Japan have caused the Oriental question to an obstacle to permanent world peace”. These unequal relations have their origin in the “forcible occupation of Tsingtau”, the “infamous twenty-one demands” from 1915 as well as in the “secret treaties Japan concluded with China since 1917”. Further the message deals with a Chinese delegate at the conference who in the eyes of the authors is a pro-Japanese traitor whom should not be trusted, which shows how important the conference is for the Chinese politicians.[25] Two things are remarkable here: for one thing, the accusations reflect the new self-perception of China as being a democratic nation, having global claims (in which we can see the long-term developments which started before the war) which were important for world peace. For another, this global consciousness seems significant enough to print it down in a newspaper addressed to English-speaking readers. Other articles stress the importance of Shantung for China – the delegation is quoted calling the province “China’s Holy Land”[26]. Finally, the delegation is cited as having two reasons to refuse the treaty: a definite guarantee that Japan would return Shandong to China and the “public opinion of the world [both] are not given”[27].

China’s case, however, was just one out of numerous claims of colonised elites in Africa and Asia, which were rejected at the Paris Peace Conference. Erez Manela shows impressively how also other national aspirations were created in the so-called “Wilsonian Moment”.[28] Still, one must by no means overestimate the direct impact of the First World War on anticolonial movements. While colonised elites developed the idea of their own nationalism during the war, anticolonial uprisings did not occur in a large scale during or immediately after the war.[29]

Apart from a grown global consciousness in different parts of the world the war also brought a change in the international order with it and created a more multipolar world. In addition to Japan, which gained the most at very little expense – in fact Japan was the only nation whose soldiers were “home at Christmas” and it lost less than 2000 men[30] – Australia is a good example for this development. The British dominion took part in the war on the British side without choice, since it was still constitutionally bound to do so.[31] Having already developed a sense of nationhood before 1914[32], the war was an important step for the country to gain its full independence and an own national identification. The role of the country in the war and its part in creating the post-war order are illustrative examples of the global dimension of the war. Australian soldiers were not only sent to a global journey – they were trained in Egypt, then fought in Transjordan and Gallipoli and finally at the Western Front –, Australia also became a so-called “sub-imperialist” power by gaining control over German Papua New-Guinea after the war.[33]

In a speech for the national elections in 1919, prime minister Hughes (1915-1923) describes this global campaign as a moment of national community. Yet, for him the main reason for Australia joining the war was to safeguard the Empire. He criticizes the Labour Party for its attempts to stop further Australian participation in the war in 1915/16 and links Australia’s and global freedom: had Labour been successful, “Australia would have been a German colony today”. Since the voters decided against conscription, he states, volunteers had to be shipped to the Western Front, who protected “civilisation”. This moral argument of volunteers protecting freedom he then uses to justify the colonisation of Papua New Guinea. The peace conference, where the country had “the right of separate representation”, Hughes even describes as a moment of nation-building: “This marks an epoch in our history. We were, by the assembled nations of the earth, granted the status of a nation.”[34]

In fact, Australia had no interest in weakening the British position in Asia and the Pacific since the British Empire was the only security against emerging Japan.[35] Still, Australia can be considered a more independent power after the war, now being an imperial power itself. Australia had thus not only an impact on the war in a far off region of the world and as a sub-imperialist power on the post-war order and the creation of a more multipolar world, but the global war had also a decisive impact on domestic politics and the national identification. The importance of this influence becomes clear if one looks at the annual commemoration of Anzac-Day in Australia today.[36]

To conclude, the “First World War” had not only global dimensions in terms of labourers and soldiers from Africa, China or Australia participating in a war between European Imperial powers either in their continent of origin or in another, but this global aspect of the war had truly global consequences. It resulted in a more multipolar world and raised national aspirations in many parts of the world, although in most cases these claims became only successful in the long run. As we have seen, in France, China and Australia, the war was understood as global, although rather different conclusions were drawn out of this global consciousness of the bloodshed. It can thus definitely be considered a global war: it transformed a fragile world order to an even more unstable postwar order and created or worsened all territorial, economic, political, ideological and intellectual conflicts of the 20th century.

Finally, the year 1917 can be seen as the beginning of the end of European rule. The entry of the US into the war on the one hand and the October Revolution in Petrograd on the other hand is, in the long term, the natal hour of the future bipolar world in which both France and the UK only played a minor role and Germany was divided. In 1917 also two ideas had emerged which further influenced not only Europe, but literally the whole world and which both dealt with the term “self-determination”: Lenin’s idea of a socialist world union and Wilson’s – copied – concept of a capitalist and liberal “League of Nations”.

Bibliography

Primary sources

South China Morning Post: 

  • Chinese at Peace Conference. Peace Delagate Accused of Treason, South China Morning Post, 14.04.1919, p. 11.
  • Over-Night Cables: The Council of Four. Last Week’s Discussions. The Kiaochau Question, South China Morning Post, 09.05.1919, p. 7.
  • China and the Treaty, Paris, Sept. 15, South China Morning Post, 18.09.1919, p. 7

The Opening of the Peace Conference. The Allies’ effort at the reconstruction of the world. January 18, 1919, in Source records of World War I, Volume VII, 1918-1919. Reconstruction and the Peace Treaty (Lewiston, N.Y.: E. Mellen Press, 1998), pp. 36-43.

Hughes, Billy: Election speech delivered at Bendigo, Vic, 30.10.1919, DOI: http://electionspeeches.moadoph.gov.au/speeches/1919-billy-hughes.

Secondary sources

Bayly, Christopher: The Birth of the Modern World 1780-1914 (Oxford: Blackwell, 2004).

Koller, Christian: The Recruitment of Colonial Troops in Africa and Asia and their Deployment in Europe during the First World War, Immigrants & Minorities, 26 (2008), pp. 111-133.

Macintyre, Stuart: A Concise History of Australia (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2009).

Manela, Erez: The Wilsonian Moment. Self-Determination and the International Origins of Anticolonial Nationalism (Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2007).

Overy, Richard: Global war 1914-45, in McNeill, John and Pomeranz, Kenneth (Ed.): The Cambridge World History. Volume 7: Production, Destruction and Connection 1750–Present, Part 2: Shared Transformations (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2015), pp. 299-320.

Payne, Stanley G.: Civil War in Europe, 1905-1949 (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2011).

Smith, Leonard V.: Post-war Treaties (Ottoman Empire/ Middle East), in 1914-1918-online. International Encyclopedia of the First World War, ed. by Ute Daniel, Peter Gatrell, Oliver Janz, […], issued by Freie Universität Berlin, Berlin 2014-10-08. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.15463/ie1418.10357.

Strachan, Hew: Economic Mobilization: Money, Munitions, and Machines, in Strachan, Hew (Ed.): The Oxford Illustrated History of the First World War (Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2014), pp. 134-148.

Strachan, Hew: The First World War. A New Illustrated History (London: Simon & Schuster, 2003).

Xu, Guoqi: Strangers on the Western Front. Chinese Workers in the Great War (Harvard: Harvard University Press, 2011).

Yizheng Zou: English newspapers in British colonial Hong Kong: the case of the South China Morning Post (1903–1941), Critical Arts, 29:1 (2015), pp. 26-40.

 

[1] Koller, Christian: The Recruitment of Colonial Troops in Africa and Asia and their Deployment in Europe during the First World War, Immigrants & Minorities, 26 (2008), pp. 111-133, here p. 118.

[2] Payne, Stanley G.: Civil War in Europe, 1905-1949 (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2011), pp. 33-95.

[3] Overy, Richard: Global war 1914-45, in McNeill, John and Pomeranz, Kenneth (Ed.): The Cambridge World History. Volume 7: Production, Destruction and Connection 1750–Present, Part 2: Shared Transformations (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2015), pp. 299-320, here p. 301.

[4] Ibid, p. 301.

[5] Strachan, Hew: The First World War. A New Illustrated History (London: Simon & Schuster, 2003), p. 70.

[6] Bayly, Christopher: The Birth of the Modern World 1780-1914 (Oxford: Blackwell, 2004), p. 461.

[7] Bayly: Modern World, p. 463.

[8] Xu, Guoqi: Strangers on the Western Front. Chinese Workers in the Great War (Harvard: Harvard University Press, 2011), pp. 10-37.

[9] Koller: Recruitment, p. 112.

[10] Strachan, Hew: Economic Mobilization: Money, Munitions, and Machines, in Strachan, Hew (Ed.): The Oxford Illustrated History of the First World War (Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2014), pp. 134-148, here p. 137.

[11] Strachan: First World War, p. 75.

[12] Koller: Recruitment, p. 113.

[13] Xu: Strangers.

[14] Koller: Recruitment, pp. 113-14.

[15] Cited in Koller: Recruitment, p. 120.

[16] The deployment of African troops in the French army even had an influence on the German propaganda, which depicted black soldiers as beasts, while the Central Powers were presented as friends of Islam in order to recruit Muslim POWs for the Ottoman Army. See Koller: Recruitment, p. 123.

[17] Strachan: First World War, pp. 80-95.

[18] Koller: Recruitment, p. 112.

[19] The Opening of the Peace Conference. The Allies’ effort at the reconstruction of the world. January 18, 1919, in Source records of World War I, Volume VII, 1918-1919. Reconstruction and the Peace Treaty (Lewiston, N.Y.: E. Mellen Press, 1998), pp. 36-43, here p. 39.

[20] Ibid., p. 40.

[21] Smith, Leonard V.: Post-war Treaties (Ottoman Empire/ Middle East), in: 1914-1918-online.

International Encyclopedia of the First World War, ed. by Ute Daniel, Peter Gatrell, Oliver Janz,

[…], issued by Freie Universität Berlin,

Berlin 2014-10-08. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.15463/ie1418.10357.

[22] The Opening of the Peace Conference, p. 42.

[23] Manela, Erez: The Wilsonian Moment. Self-Determination and the International Origins of Anticolonial Nationalism (Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2007), pp. 99-117.

[24]  Yizheng Zou: English newspapers in British colonial Hong Kong: the case of the South China Morning Post (1903–1941), Critical Arts, 29:1 (2015), pp. 26-40.

[25] Chinese at Peace Conference. Peace Delagate Accused of Treason, South China Morning Post, 14.04.1919, p. 11.

[26] Over-Night Cables: The Council of Four. Last Week’s Discussions. The Kiaochau Question, South China Morning Post, 09.05.1919, p. 7.

[27] China and the Treaty, Paris, Sept. 15, South China Morning Post, 18.09.1919, p. 7.

[28] Manela: The Wilsonian Moment.

[29] Strachan: First World War, p. 94; see also: Bayly: Modern World, p. 466.

[30] Strachan: First World War, p. 73.

[31] Macintyre, Stuart: A Concise History of Australia (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2009), p. 157.

[32] Bayly: Modern World, p. 462.

[33] Macintyre: Australia, pp. 159-167.

[34] Hughes, Billy: Election speech delivered at Bendigo, Vic on October 30th, 1919. http://electionspeeches.moadoph.gov.au/speeches/1919-billy-hughes.

[35] Macintyre: Australia, p. 167.

[36] See for instance the official Australian website of the commemoration of Anzac-Day: https://www.awm.gov.au/commemoration/anzac/anzac-tradition/.